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Christmas thoughts 2018

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Location
South Carolina, USA
A macaronic song for Christmas Day, The Boar's Head Carol:

The boar's head in hand bring I,
Bedeck'd with bays and rosemary.
And I pray you, my masters, be merry
Quot estis in convivio (Translation: As many as are in the feast)

CHORUS
Caput apri defero (Translation: The boar's head I bear)
Reddens laudes Domino (Translation: Giving praises to the Lord)

The boar's head, as I understand,
Is the rarest dish in all this land,
Which thus bedeck'd with a gay garland
Let us servire cantico. (Translation: Let us serve with a song)

CHORUS

Our steward hath provided this
In honour of the King of Bliss;
Which on this day to be servèd is
In Reginensi atrio. (Translation: In the hall of Queen’s [College, Oxford]

William Henry Husk, Librarian to the Sacred Harmonic Society, The Queen's College, wrote about the tradition in his Songs of the Nativity Being Christmas Carols, Ancient and Modern (1868):

Where an amusing tradition formerly current in Oxford concerning the boar's head custom, which represented that usage as a commemoration of an act of valour performed by a student of the college, who, while walking in the neighbouring forest of Shotover and reading Aristotle, was suddenly attacked by a wild boar. The furious beast came open-mouthed upon the youth, who, however, very courageously, and with a happy presence of mind, thrust the volume he was reading down the boar's throat, crying, "Græcum est," (Greek compliments) and fairly choked the savage with the sage.
 
Last edited:

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
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The Northern Forest
Just read this carefully and have a bone to pick. My statement that adeste means arise was wrong because it was a typo. I meant arrive, for be present. But I don't think in Latin it is the same as come. It is one of those words in Latin that reflect more my specialty, the military side. It comes from adsum , meaning (lit.) I am to. Remember, the military usages in Rome were ubiquitous. Many things and words must be interpreted in terms of how a soldier would use them. Adsum, Present Sir, is a roll call response. The person is not coming, but is there. So Adeste Fideles, plural imperative (from Latin for a military command) is freely translated as "You Faithful ones had better be there!"
Yes when we were beginning Latin, we had to answer 'adsum' (which is also 'I am at') to the register -
and call out 'abest' for any kid who was absent.
But I still don't think 'Be here, all ye faithful' would have caught on so well.
 
Joined
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Likes
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Location
South Carolina, USA
Yes when we were beginning Latin, we had to answer 'adsum' (which is also 'I am at') to the register -
and call out 'abest' for any kid who was absent.
But I still don't think 'Be here, all ye faithful' would have caught on so well.
How the martial values has slipped away.:oops::oops::oops:. What's next? Bagpipers in Suit and tie?
 
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Location
Halfway between Key West and Sault Saint Marie
I would love to see a woman, tied naked and spread wide open, IMPALED ON A CHRISTMAS TREE!
First, she is tied, spread, the suspended above the Christmas Tree. Next, she is slowly lowered, to the top of the Christmas Tree enters her vagina. Her arms above her head, she is slowly, painfully lowered, to where the Christmas Tree enters her!
Last, the Christmas Tree top exits her mouth.
Impaled on a Christmas Tree.
That is my Kinky Krismas dream.
Could one of our many artists create that?
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Joined
Jan 1, 2011
Likes
105,648
Location
The Northern Forest
A macaronic song for Christmas Day, The Boar's Head Carol:

The boar's head in hand bring I,
Bedeck'd with bays and rosemary.
And I pray you, my masters, be merry
Quot estis in convivio (Translation: As many as are in the feast)

CHORUS
Caput apri defero (Translation: The boar's head I bear)
Reddens laudes Domino (Translation: Giving praises to the Lord)

The boar's head, as I understand,
Is the rarest dish in all this land,
Which thus bedeck'd with a gay garland
Let us servire cantico. (Translation: Let us serve with a song)

CHORUS

Our steward hath provided this
In honour of the King of Bliss;
Which on this day to be servèd is
In Reginensi atrio. (Translation: In the hall of Queen’s [College, Oxford]

William Henry Husk, Librarian to the Sacred Harmonic Society, The Queen's College, wrote about the tradition in his Songs of the Nativity Being Christmas Carols, Ancient and Modern (1868):

Where an amusing tradition formerly current in Oxford concerning the boar's head custom, which represented that usage as a commemoration of an act of valour performed by a student of the college, who, while walking in the neighbouring forest of Shotover and reading Aristotle, was suddenly attacked by a wild boar. The furious beast came open-mouthed upon the youth, who, however, very courageously, and with a happy presence of mind, thrust the volume he was reading down the boar's throat, crying, "Græcum est," (Greek compliments) and fairly choked the savage with the sage.
 
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Likes
15,712
Location
South Carolina, USA
I would love to see a woman, tied naked and spread wide open, IMPALED ON A CHRISTMAS TREE!
First, she is tied, spread, the suspended above the Christmas Tree. Next, she is slowly lowered, to the top of the Christmas Tree enters her vagina. Her arms above her head, she is slowly, painfully lowered, to where the Christmas Tree enters her!
Last, the Christmas Tree top exits her mouth.
Impaled on a Christmas Tree.
That is my Kinky Krismas dream.
Could one of our many artists create that?
Come on artists! You've got to support a man who loves chocolate covered nipples. (of course, who doesn't?)
 
Joined
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Likes
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Location
South Carolina, USA
Thank you Eulalia!

Three chefs (for three kings) bear the platter. Afterwords, the herbs are distributed to the choir and the orange from the moth to the soloist (is that a comment on soloists?)
 

Gibbs505

SERVORUM DOMITOR
Joined
Jul 23, 2012
Likes
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Location
Canada
Just read this carefully and have a bone to pick. My statement that adeste means arise was wrong because it was a typo. I meant arrive, for be present. But I don't think in Latin it is the same as come. It is one of those words in Latin that reflect more my specialty, the military side. It comes from adsum , meaning (lit.) I am to. Remember, the military usages in Rome were ubiquitous. Many things and words must be interpreted in terms of how a soldier would use them. Adsum, Present Sir, is a roll call response. The person is not coming, but is there. So Adeste Fideles, plural imperative (from Latin for a military command) is freely translated as "You Faithful ones had better be there!"
I learn more every day!
 
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Likes
15,712
Location
South Carolina, USA

Baracus

Rectidolor
Joined
Sep 25, 2010
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Caesaromagus (Essex)
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