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How To Talk For Artists And Users (Photo-Manipulations)

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Madiosi

Depictor of Dreams
Staff member
Hi madiosi, don´t know, how to do it. If possible, i work on to do it for us. i´m new in Photoshop. it´s not eassy at all.
Sorry, I'm not a PhotoShopper, I'm a PaintShopper. But I'm sure, you can change the backround to transparent in the File preferences.
Which Version from PS use you? Maybe I can find a solution.
 

Jollyrei

Angelus Mortis
Staff member
Hi madiosi, don´t know, how to do it. If possible, i work on to do it for us. i´m new in Photoshop. it´s not eassy at all.
I made a fast test with photoshop cc 2018. Cut out, paste as new layer made the others invisible, save as png.
View attachment 861321
There are a couple of ways to do it in Photoshop (I use CS6). The first is to create a channel mask, which you then overlay on the original image.

My preferred method these days is to create a duplicate layer of the background, and put a black solid colour layer under that duplicate. Then use the erase tools to erase the background you don't want (the black layer will show up anything that isn't erased yet). Then "burn" your image completely black, invert it so that it is now completely white, and use that cutout white image as your mask on the original (I do that so that if any additional erasing needs to be done, or if you want to add bits back in, you can, simply by erasing the white areas, or painting them back in with the white paintbrush).

For a fast and dirty cutout, especially with a white background like this, you could just use the background eraser tool (set sensitivity so it only erases the white, and not the other bits you want to keep, like her hair) around the delicate bits and edges, and then use the eraser set at about 90% hardness to erase the rest.
 

Madiosi

Depictor of Dreams
Staff member
There are a couple of ways to do it in Photoshop (I use CS6). The first is to create a channel mask, which you then overlay on the original image.

My preferred method these days is to create a duplicate layer of the background, and put a black solid colour layer under that duplicate. Then use the erase tools to erase the background you don't want (the black layer will show up anything that isn't erased yet). Then "burn" your image completely black, invert it so that it is now completely white, and use that cutout white image as your mask on the original (I do that so that if any additional erasing needs to be done, or if you want to add bits back in, you can, simply by erasing the white areas, or painting them back in with the white paintbrush).

For a fast and dirty cutout, especially with a white background like this, you could just use the background eraser tool (set sensitivity so it only erases the white, and not the other bits you want to keep, like her hair) around the delicate bits and edges, and then use the eraser set at about 90% hardness to erase the rest.
I must confess, all these steps made me confuse. And in PSP it's a very easy thing. Cut out the shape, copy it, insert as new image, save as xxx.png. Done!
 

Jollyrei

Angelus Mortis
Staff member
I must confess, all these steps made me confuse. And in PSP it's a very easy thing. Cut out the shape, copy it, insert as new image, save as xxx.png. Done!
You can do it that simply in Photoshop as well. Take image - erase the background around your subject to make the cutout. Save as png.

But that process is "destructive" in that once you have cut out the shape, the bits you erase are gone. If you use a masking method, you can adjust the mask, and even bring back some parts of what you originally erased, if you want to (not destructive).
 
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