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Jedakk's Masterpiece

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jedakk

CARNIFEX MAXIMUS
Jedakk
I wonder if in the future you could find time to illustrate the execution of Lucilla at her twelfth and last crucifixion?
Finding the time is the key! Before I can illustrate it I have to write it, and the last thing I want to do is have that turn out disappointing. It's not enough just to write a narrative of that last crucifixion, even if they would give her some special treatment and make a spectacle out of it.

All of that has to revolve around a plot, so I'll have to come up with that first, then create the story around that. Once that's done to my satisfaction, I can start creating illustrations for it.

Lucilla was supposed to be a character who was incidental to Sabina's story. She was a real over-the-top character, condemned to a punishment she didn't deserve and the reverse of the way a crucifixion victim was supposed to act. What we were supposed to get was this brief snapshot of her life, after which we'd move on with Sabina's story. But instead she caught everyone's imagination, including my own, and everyone wanted to know what became of her after Sabina's narrative ended.

We will see, but this is going to take some time.
 

thehangingtree

Proconsul
Staff member
Finding the time is the key! Before I can illustrate it I have to write it, and the last thing I want to do is have that turn out disappointing. It's not enough just to write a narrative of that last crucifixion, even if they would give her some special treatment and make a spectacle out of it.

All of that has to revolve around a plot, so I'll have to come up with that first, then create the story around that. Once that's done to my satisfaction, I can start creating illustrations for it.

Lucilla was supposed to be a character who was incidental to Sabina's story. She was a real over-the-top character, condemned to a punishment she didn't deserve and the reverse of the way a crucifixion victim was supposed to act. What we were supposed to get was this brief snapshot of her life, after which we'd move on with Sabina's story. But instead she caught everyone's imagination, including my own, and everyone wanted to know what became of her after Sabina's narrative ended.

We will see, but this is going to take some time.
I'll buy the fucking burial plot so get busy or I will go on air 24 hours relieved only by Sean Hannity...
cigar rush 001.jpg
Rush L.

:confused::doh::eek:
 

Marcius

Governor
Roman prostitutes, at least about the time of the late republic/early empire, were required to wear red togas ("flame red" according to Colleen McCullough, not sure where she got that). The toga was generally reserved for men, but prostitutes were an exception, maybe because a toga was quick and easy to get out of. I didn't have a toga to put on Verina, so I settled for a short chiton instead, and I made it flame red because I wanted her to stand out.

I've been reading an article on Roman female clothing [Kelly Olson (2002) Matrona and Whore: The Clothing of Women in Roman Antiquity, Fashion Theory, 6:4, 387-420] and noted this:

It is one contention of this study that the toga was not in fact the “normal” dress of the whore, but only one of many types of dress prostitutes could adopt. Although this has been stated by Thomas McGinn, an account of the descriptive details of prostitute clothing is lacking, and needs to be provided comprehensively. There are many passages in classical literature in which whores, depending on their station, appear in everything from rich clothing all the way down to little (or no) clothing at all: passages in which, moreover, the toga as their distinctive dress is not named.​
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
I've been reading an article on Roman female clothing [Kelly Olson (2002) Matrona and Whore: The Clothing of Women in Roman Antiquity, Fashion Theory, 6:4, 387-420] and noted this:

It is one contention of this study that the toga was not in fact the “normal” dress of the whore, but only one of many types of dress prostitutes could adopt. Although this has been stated by Thomas McGinn, an account of the descriptive details of prostitute clothing is lacking, and needs to be provided comprehensively. There are many passages in classical literature in which whores, depending on their station, appear in everything from rich clothing all the way down to little (or no) clothing at all: passages in which, moreover, the toga as their distinctive dress is not named.​
'Roman' is of course ambiguous. There might have been laws in the city of Rome (at least at some time) about who could wear what and/or how prostitutes should make their trade known, but it's hard to believe such laws applied throughout the Roman world. And anything about prostitutes in (male) classical sources has to be taken with a pinch of salt, much of it a mixture of hypocritical moralising and ill-disguised wishful thinking!
 

Marcius

Governor
'Roman' is of course ambiguous. There might have been laws in the city of Rome (at least at some time) about who could wear what and/or how prostitutes should make their trade known, but it's hard to believe such laws applied throughout the Roman world. And anything about prostitutes in (male) classical sources has to be taken with a pinch of salt, much of it a mixture of hypocritical moralising and ill-disguised wishful thinking!
Indeed, the idea of prostitutes in Arabia or Scotland donning togas is absurd on its face (and other body parts). It is known that by the time of Hadrian it was difficult enough to make senators and equestrians wear it in Rome itself. Speaking of the sources: mulier togata in many cases could be less than a literal description.
 

Ophalmos

Condemned
With the setting of her titulus at the top of her cross, Sabina's executioners have completed the work of crucifying her and she has begun the slow agonized struggle that will wring her life out, drop by drop. Now all of her weight hangs by the cold iron nails driven through her wrists and feet; her only possibility of any rest will come when she is desperate enough to fit the horn of the cornu between her legs either into her rectum or vagina; and the final humiliation is the sign above her head that tells everyone who she is and what she did to deserve this punishment.

Julia Lepida remarks on how many have died on this cross, and how the nail holes from their crucifixions are all beyond her fingertips and below her feet. She is the smallest of all of the victims who have agonized their lives away on this cross.

These timbers had held many tortured criminals and slaves before her; the gods only knew how many, but there were at least a dozen nail holes in the broad patches of dried blood beyond her fingertips and twice that many in the blood-soaked wood below her toes. Those who had struggled their lives out on this cross had all been much larger than either of us.

She and I had watched many crucifixions back in Pompeii, but those were all slaves and criminals that meant nothing to us, a morning’s entertainment. As horrible as the cross was, everyone accepted its torture as the fitting punishment for slaves, the slower the better, with death merely being the end of their punishment. A victim who died after suffering only two days on the cross was said to have died rather quickly.​
 
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