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Eulalia

Poet Laureate
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Jan 1, 2011
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The Northern Forest
#61
The season and Latin

Veni, veni Emmanuel!
Captivum solve Israel!
Qui gemit in exilio,
Privatus Dei Filio,
Gaude, gaude, Emmanuel
nascetur pro te, Israel.


Veni o Jesse virgula!
Ex hostis tuos ungula,
De specu tuos tartari
Educ, et antro barathri.
Gaude, gaude, Emmanuel
nascetur pro te, Israel.


Veni, veni o oriens!
Solare nos adveniens,
Noctis depelle nebulas,
Dirasque noctis tenebras.
Gaude, gaude, Emmanuel
nascetur pro te, Israel. [5]


Veni clavis Davidica!
Regna reclude coelica,
Fac iter Tutum superum,
Et claude vias Inferum.
Gaude, gaude, Emmanuel
nascetur pro te, Israel.


Veni, veni Adonai![16]
Qui populo in Sinai
Legem dedisti vertice,
In maiestate gloriae.
Gaude, gaude, Emmanuel
nascetur pro te, Israel.


Veni, O Sapientia,
Quae hic disponis omnia,
Veni, viam prudentiae
Ut doceas et gloriae.


Veni, Veni, Rex Gentium,
Veni, Redemptor omnium,
Ut salves tuos famulos
Peccati sibi conscios.
That hymn was based on the 'Seven great Os', the Magnificat antiphons sung at Vespers during the week before Christmas, beginning on the evening of December 16th (so liturgically the 17th, the day begins at sunset) with 'O Sapientia...' (Down boys, they have no connection whatsoever with l'Histoire d'O ;) )


It was translated in the nineteenth century by the well-known hymn-writer J. M. Neale, and is familiar at least in the Anglican world as the Advent hymn 'O Come, O Come Emmanuel', sung to a haunting Hebrew melody.

 
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
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23,319
Location
South Carolina, USA
#66
That hymn was based on the 'Seven great Os', the Magnificat antiphons sung at Vespers during the week before Christmas, beginning on the evening of December 16th (so liturgically the 17th, the day begins at sunset) with 'O Sapientia...' (Down boys, they have no connection whatsoever with l'Histoire d'O ;) )


It was translated in the nineteenth century by the well-known hymn-writer J. M. Neale, and is familiar at least in the Anglican world as the Advent hymn 'O Come, O Come Emmanuel', sung to a haunting Hebrew melody.

It is interesting to note that the initial words of the actual antiphons in reverse order form an acrostic: O Emmanuel, O Rex, O Oriens, O Clavis, O Radix ("virgula" in the hymn), O Adonai, O Sapientia. ERO CRAS can be loosely translated as "I will be there tomorrow". That is a fitting message indeed since Christ's birth falls on the following day.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
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2,397
Location
United States
#67
I asked my 11th grade Latin teacher (a brilliant PhD.) whether the Classical Latin we studied was really spoken by the people. He replied that graffiti showed not. He continued, "Cicero's grammar was not always followed by the average schmuck sweeping up the horse dung on the Appian Way!"
I believe Eulalia and I had a discussion recently in another thread about how to say "horse dung" ("horse shit" in "common" English) in classical Latin, and she corrected my initial suggestion. Really useful everyday expressions don't often appear in classical writing.
 
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South Carolina, USA
#69
Not Latin, but having a language issue, I found it most appropriate to test out whether Scandinavian chåræcters do wørk here (and @madiosi in your e-library software)?
For a stupid story I maybe will post.
Not only not Latin, but a language group which draws almost nothing from Latin! Heresy! :bash:
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Joined
Jan 1, 2011
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110,647
Location
The Northern Forest
#72
Yes, you should find that any characters you'll find in standard Word or Apple menus will copy here okay,
certainly if you use a common font. Here's a few from the range I often use in the day-job: þðæÆøüÞäÐå
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Joined
Jan 1, 2011
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110,647
Location
The Northern Forest
#74
Students of Latin often note that domi is the locative of domus in literary classical Latin.
But you wouldn't use the locative after ite (go), that would be 'Romans go at home',
for 'Romans go (to) home' you use accusative, domum, as the legionary quite correctly did.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
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2,397
Location
United States
#77
Help.....
What is Latin,for "Escaped Slave" please.??
thank you....
servus fugitivus (masculine nominative), serva fugitiva (feminine)
servum fugitivum (masculine accusative), servam fugitivam (feminine)
At least that's what I think. There are three more cases: genitive, dative, and ablative. There are also five declensions. You have to memorize what declension a noun is in. I'm certain that everybody back then (most of whom couldn't read) had all this down perfectly.
(Eulalia certainly does, even if they did not. Correcting the wrong someone--like Nero--might lead to trouble, though.)
 
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Caesaromagus (Essex)
#78
servus fugitivus (masculine nominative), serva fugitiva (feminine)
servum fugitivum (masculine accusative), servam fugitivam (feminine)
At least that's what I think. There are three more cases: genitive, dative, and ablative. There are also five declensions. You have to memorize what declension a noun is in. I'm certain that everybody back then (most of whom couldn't read) had all this down perfectly.
(Eulalia certainly does, even if they did not. Correcting the wrong someone--like Nero--might lead to trouble, though.)
thanks
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Joined
Jan 1, 2011
Likes
110,647
Location
The Northern Forest
#79
servus fugitivus (masculine nominative), serva fugitiva (feminine)
servum fugitivum (masculine accusative), servam fugitivam (feminine)
At least that's what I think. There are three more cases: genitive, dative, and ablative. There are also five declensions. You have to memorize what declension a noun is in. I'm certain that everybody back then (most of whom couldn't read) had all this down perfectly.
(Eulalia certainly does, even if they did not. Correcting the wrong someone--like Nero--might lead to trouble, though.)
Quite right, SERVA FUGITIVA would be fine for a titulus on her cross.
 
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