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The Georgia Peach - A Story of the American Civil War

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Fossy

Tribune
The Georgia Peach – A Story of the American Civil War

Introduction


By May 1864 the War Between the States had been wreaking its devastating havoc for over three interminable years. With an election looming Lincoln was under immense pressure to cease hostilities and the South were ready to accept a peace which allowed them to retain their way of life. But that would not happen. The President had appointed new Generals and given then an open mandate to end the war.

Generals Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman were to lead the Union army to victory by engaging in a strategy of ‘all-out war’. The core of this plan was to ‘scorch the earth’ across the heart of the Southern States, a plan that would eventually deliver a devastating impact throughout the whole of Georgia.

But on the 11th May 1864, Sherman was camped high above the banks of the Oostanuala river, readying his troops for the inevitable, impending confrontation with Joe Johnston’s Confederate army. He was already planning to replace his established, but potentially vulnerable, supply lines with a ‘foraging’ process that would see the Union soldiers living from whatever the Georgia land had to offer.

Foraging Groups, colloquially referred to as ‘Bummers’, raided plantations, with crops and livestock being subjected to widespread confiscation and/or destruction. Such raids were not without their misdemeanours …

Over the next days and weeks, I intend to publish an account of one such foraging raid on White Orchard Mansion, a raid that took place on the 11th May 1864. White Orchard Plantation had been the home of Colonel and Mrs John McCown, until their untimely deaths had been brought about by the War and Pneumonia respectively. The small slave stock and the large estate were now managed solely by their young daughter, Catherine …

The build-up is intended to be contextual and detailed in order to set the scene, and so I ask you to bear with it. Begin to imagine what could and will happen to our ‘heroine’, and I can assure you that the anticipation will be very much worth it as the story evolves.

Once the tale is told I shall publish a full PDF version in the CF Archives, and so I am hoping that this thread itself will be become a place of interaction where views, comments and feedback can be openly exchanged on either this story or the context and subject … a subject that still remains a matter for much contention to this very day.

As ever your support is what inspires me and is very much appreciated.


Thanks to @Praefectus Praetorio, @windar and @RacingRodent for their inspiration, support and editing skills.

(Disclaimer: The story, within the context of the Civil War, is based upon actual events. The Senior Military figures are real historical people, but the main protagonists being Lieutenant Sampson, Sergeant Oak and our leading lady Catherine McCown, are entirely fictional)

My regular muse, Charlotte, is still gainfully employed as Mackayla Lane in one of my other projects, and so I have been lucky enough to be able to cast the gorgeous Nina Dobrev in the role of Catherine.

I have taken the liberty of tagging the following CF’ers because you have all shown interest in supporting my previous works. I hope that you don’t mind.
@Barabbas @Barbaria1 @Beate @bkcharmer @bobinder @crumera @cruxlover @ctcua @ERIN the Brave @Eulalia @Eva Inanna @Gibbs505 @gjpain @Heineudo @Jackie1111 @jacksjg89 @Jon Smithie @Kathy @Kuba @Madiosi @Marcella @markus @messaline @MJMcHugh @montycrusto @nicole @old slave @Peony @phlebas @Puritan @Quiet Paul @RacingRodent @Rias @thehangingtree @toxidomaskjr @twonines @wildsouthman @windar @Wragg @StarbuckSlut @shredword @The Beast @thommorr
 

Fossy

Tribune
The Georgia Peach – A Story of the American Civil War.

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war …”

From The Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln - November 19, 1863



Chapter 1 – On the banks of the Oostanuala, May 11th 1864


It was a high rock face, overlooking the dark violence of the swollen Oostanaula river. He sat alone, watching as the early morning arrivals broke ranks and the columns began to disperse in the steady rain preparing to make camp. He felt the coolness run down his neck, the water soaking every part of him, his hat, his clothes, taking the grime and dust with it. A vast sea of mud surrounded them all.

The river was rising again, and was already well beyond their ability to ford, as they might have done before the rains. Now, it was angry and swirling. In the early gloom, the motion accentuated by the small fires that lined the riverbank, a flickering protest to the misery of the weather, the only guiding light the men would have to reach the crossing.

“Good morning Sergeant,” said a sleepy General Sherman, “What news have you brought for me today?”

“Mornin’ Gen’ral. I only deliver the news Sir, I don’t read it,” replied the Sergeant, maintaining an unnecessary diligence.

The General looked at the man, a ‘Bummer’, part of the newly formed foraging troop. He nodded, smiled, acknowledged the departing courier and opened the dispatch.

It was not what he had expected to read, not at all.

It was from Lieutenant Evans Sampson of Logan’s XV Corp. Evans was in charge of a foraging party, but why was he bothering Sherman with details such as this. All of his army now deployed foragers, or ‘Bummers’ as they had been newly termed. He himself had sanctioned the practice. As his army marched into Georgia, although Sherman still had his supply line back to Chattanooga, he needed to reduce his reliance on it and use the natural land to make his army more mobile. So why had Sampson not contacted his commanding officer directly if he had a problem …

… Sherman read on.

“General, Sir, please let me apologise for bringing this matter to your personal attention. In any other context it would be considered incidental but I felt compelled to write you directly when the chief inhabitant of the residence we are in mentioned your name in her defence …”


Chapter 2 – White Orchard Plantation, May 11th 1864

“You do not have to lock nor guard the door Lieutenant; it is my house and I will say what does and does not happen inside its walls.”

Sampson appraised the girl, his gaze moving slowly from her dainty ankle, clad in white silk and exposed just a little above her slipper, to her slender waist and rising bosom pressed tightly to her person by the fashionable crinoline and boned corset underneath the faded peach dress that she wore. Despite the garment being a little careworn, a clear sign of the times, the girl could still be considered beautiful by any man’s standards, especially one who had not enjoyed the company of any woman, never mind a beautiful one, for some time.

As a final and parting imposition he increased the intensity of his stare, assessing her shape, her looks … every delicate feature perfectly formed from her slightly button nose, to her wide long-lashed eyes and high cheeks bones.

The girl, through the curtain of long dark hair that framed her face, returned his scrutiny with a glare of her own. Her expression of reproach reflected the steely determination that had enabled her to persevere through the deaths of both of her parents, and, despite the ever-increasing gravity of these present times, to maintain at least some semblance of normality at White Orchard.

Catherine McCown was only too aware of the generous helping of time that this junior officer allowed his gaze to dwell on her person and it made her uneasy.

“It is for your own protection Miss that I have your room secured. It keeps my men out as well as keeping you in.”

She shivered at his words. Why on earth would he need to concern himself about keeping his own men out of her boudoir? Were they savages?

As he turned to leave, pulling the double doors of Miss McCown’s bedchamber closed, she shouted after him in a most unladylike manner.

“And you make sure that the General receives my message.”

Uncle Billy would sort this misunderstanding out, she just knew he would. ‘Uncle Billy’ was the esteemed General William Tecumseh Sherman, her Godfather, best friend and erstwhile colleague of her late father. Colonel John McCown, had been killed in gallant action at Shiloh Church back in April of ’62, fighting on the opposing side to Uncle Billy.

They had been West Point Graduates together, class of ’40, before she was even born. Since her father’s much-lamented death Catherine had lived on the plantation at White Orchard with a handful of slaves and her Mama, until Pneumonia had taken her too just a few months ago.

She knew that living here on her own, a young girl barely out of her teenage years, with only a handful of slaves for company, was dangerous, especially with the war getting ever closer. But where else would she go?

That goddamned seditionist Lincoln had ‘freed’ the slaves back in ’62, any many had run away from White Orchard just as they did from all of the neighbouring plantations. But some didn’t, and the few that were eventually re-caught and punished served as a warning to others thinking of doing the same. Back then her daddy had warned the negroes that there was no better life, and they should not consider themselves freemen. But now the only slaves that remained were those who had been here so long they had no idea where else to go, or those that lacked the courage to attempt to run. The situation with the slaves was as big a mess as everything else was right now.

Uncle Billy would help her, she was certain of it.

The exasperated Lieutenant took a moment as he stopped outside the girl’s bedroom doors. His hand tightly gripped the door knobs which he had closed behind himself.

Did she really want him to write to the General? He couldn’t do that, could he? But what if what she said was true and he ignored her request. What if she really did know the General … more than that, she said he was her Godfather.

With a resigned sigh he called for Sergeant Oaks. He needed to dictate a message.


To Be Continued …
 

Attachments

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Whoa, Fossy! The Civil War is a MAJOR interest of mine! Because of that I will read your story with close attention. The fact that "Georgia Peach" Catherine is threatened is only a minor attraction. :rolleyes: I hope she will be safe. I tremble to think of the horrid things those Yankee scum might do to this sweet, nubile, soft, fair, Southern Belle:very_hot:.
 

Fossy

Tribune
Whoa, Fossy! The Civil War is a MAJOR interest of mine! Because of that I will read your story with close attention. The fact that "Georgia Peach" Catherine is threatened is only a minor attraction. :rolleyes: I hope she will be safe. I tremble to think of the horrid things those Yankee scum might do to this sweet, nubile, soft, fair, Southern Belle:very_hot:.
Your trembling thoughts might not be too far from the mark PrPr - as you will discover ;)
 

messaline

Crucified Amazon
Mmmmmm ! I hope that it will be at the same level that the film "Autant en emporte le vent" (Gone with the wind) that I always was adoring ...
... my romantic side ... ;)
... and dont doubt that your Georgia Peach is as far as beautiful than Vivien Legh ...
 

Fossy

Tribune
Mmmmmm ! I hope that it will be at the same level that the film "Autant en emporte le vent" (Gone with the wind) that I always was adoring ...
... my romantic side ... ;)
... and dont doubt that your Georgia Peach is as far as beautiful than Vivien Legh ...
Catherine is a beauty indeed and certainly deserves romancing - whether she gets it or not is. Completely different matter ;)
 
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