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Wtf And Oddities

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Joined
Apr 30, 2018
Likes
11,885
Location
Germany
Funny and interesting. I learned a lot about Albanians and about Caprice Barb :)
She was surprisingly pleasend and among her co-stars the only one I would consider to be seen with.
She is very patient in dealing with doofus (provided there is a camera) - entirely unlike here on CF.
She likes anal :)
I missed a statement regarding bjs...
 

dommmu

Executioner
Joined
Dec 5, 2017
Likes
960
Location
Somewhere in the middle of Europe
Funny and interesting. I learned a lot about Albanians and about Caprice Barb :)
She was surprisingly pleasend and among her co-stars the only one I would consider to be seen with.
She is very patient in dealing with doofus (provided there is a camera) - entirely unlike here on CF.
She likes anal :)
I missed a statement regarding bjs...
The best part for me is how the guy manages not to break character the whole time. And of course his fear of being replaced by machines in every aspect of life :D
 

Naraku

Draconarius
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Likes
15,259
Location
Florida, USA

Primus pilus

Magister Australis
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Likes
19,813
Location
Down Under
We know all about cane toads in Florida. They're one of many species that came here from somewhere else and now we can't get rid of them...like New Yorkers...or pythons. In fact, that could have been shot here.
What Pp knew as Bufo marinus, which the taxonomists now insist on calling Rhinella marina, is actually native to Central and the northern parts of South America so it is not surprising that they are increasing around Florida.

An enterprising entomologist from Pp’s alma mater brought the beast from Hawaii to Banana Bender Land in the 1930s in a failed attempt to control a couple of pest coleoptera species in sugarcane crops.
 
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Naraku

Draconarius
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Likes
15,259
Location
Florida, USA
What Pp knew as Bufo marinus, which the taxonomists now insist on calling Rhinella marina, is actually native to Central and the northern parts of South America so it is not surprising that they are increasing around Florida.

An enterprising entomologist from Pp’s alma mater brought the beast from Hawaii to Banana Bender Land in the 1930s in a failed attempt to control a couple of pest coleoptera species in sugarcane crops.
They were brought into Florida in the 1930s & 40s for pretty much the same reason. The experiment failed. The real explosion in population began with an accidental release of a shipment to an exotic animal dealer at Miami International Airport in 1957 and later accidental and deliberate releases in the 60s. They are now spread throughout south and central Florida. Along with eating native lizards, frogs and birds, they are dangerous to pets, especially dogs, because of their toxic glands. The Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission recommends that, if you see one, you should kill it.

I've only seen a couple in my mostly urban neighborhood, including one I ran over a few years ago, but my brother lives near the river and he sees them quite often.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2012
Likes
4,508
Location
Bedford, UK
There must have been some purpose to this - but What?
In the last three the "Dead?" are laid out neatly in rows - what (if anything) are we meant to read into that.

On another (though just possibly related) topic I was reading about "The Fates" or Erinyes as the ancient Greeks called them (Dirae to the Romans).
I liked this descriotion:
"Though the playwright Aeschyus saw them as hideous scaly monsters, The Furies are generally depicted as serious young women in black mourning clothes, although when on a case they changed into short maiden dresses with knee-high hunting boots and armed themselves with whips."
The latter sound like what we today would call Dominatrices. Kinky, very kinky them old Greeks.
481px-Klytaimnestra_Erinyes_Louvre_Cp710.jpg d12azho-9219757f-0c42-487f-9cf7-8c8c312a5130.jpg orestes_pursued_by_the_furies_by_speeh_d20vjfw-pre.jpg T40.1Erinyes.jpg
 
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