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Bataan Barb

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Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
And all the soldiers think : "Oh, no! Ohno is there!":D
Lox gets the prize for noting the connection between Ohno’s name and the English language expression.❤️
 

old slave

FELIS RESPICIENS
The officer was none other than Major (Rikugun-Shōsa) Fumihisa Ohno,
Yet another character and storyline have been introduced. @Barbaria1 , have you been taking lessons off @Praefectus Praetorio ? At least in this story you have killed off about half of the named individuals, you have sympathy for the brain capacity of your readers.
 

twonines

Senator
As with most of Barb`s stories, this one shows the depths of her research and attention to detail, where it perhaps differs, is that she has portrayed herself in a more sympathetic light. Her consideration for her fellow nurses and the absence of complaints about her condition, together with the fact that she has suffered multiple rapes, rather than receiving frequent and severe beatings for flouting authority single it out from the norm.
What follows is bound to be intriguing.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
A very disturbing article of the fate of some Australian nurses and service personnel at the hands of the Japanese further south in Indonesia. Just for those who might think Barbara is exaggerating to make a good story.

Although this article doesn't mention it, other accounts detail that several nurses were raped before being forced into the sea and shot.
This took place on 2/14/1943 - 82 years and one week ago
 
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twonines

Senator
A very disturbing article of the fate of some Australian nurses and service personnel at the hands of the Japanese further south in Indonesia. Just for those who might think Barbara is exaggerating to make a good story.

Although this article doesn't mention it, other accounts detail that several nurses were raped before being forced into the sea and shot.
Similar treatment was meted out by the Japanese after the fall of Hong Kong.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
I know all about the Bataan Death March...I hate general Douglas Mac Arthur because he left his men behind to suffer at the hands of the Japanese! He was a coward!
I beg to differ. There are many reasons to fault MacArthur's leadership in the defense of the Phillipines. However, to call him a coward is completely unjustified.
The Arcadia Conferences, held in Washington between 22 December 1941 and 14 January 1942, and involving the chiefs of staff of the United States and Britain had decided that no help would be supplied to the American forces on the Philippines. It was resolved that "that only the minimum of force necessary for the safeguarding of vital interests in other theaters should be diverted from the operations against Germany" MacArthur was not notified of this decision but was constantly assured that help was on the way.
MacArthur had determined and notified Washington that he would remain on Corregidor until the end. It was only on the 4th of February, that he learned from an intelligence officer, Lieutenant Colonel Warren J. Clear, of the Arcadia decision. MacArthur was deeply shocked to learn that he and his command had effectively been abandoned to the Japanese by President Roosevelt. President Quezon of the Philippines was enraged by the news and sent a cable to Roosevelt requesting immediate independence for the Philippines so that his government could negotiate a state of neutrality with the Japanese.
With him on Corregidor were his wife, Jean MacArthur, and young son, Arthur MacArthur IV. Arthur celebrated his fourth birthday within the fortress, on 21 February 1942. When an aide asked about Arthur's possible fate, MacArthur replied: "He is a soldier's son." Up until that time, there is no record of the Geral requesting or planning an escape from his headquarters.
The day after his son's birthday (today for those in Britain and eastward), February 22, 1942, on the advice of Army Chief of Staff, George Marshall, President Roosevelt sent a direct order to MacArthur to leave for Australia as soon as possible. Such an order from the Commander-in-Chief cannot be ignored. MacArthur delayed until early March. It was only on March 11th, when advised that the PT boats that would attempt to ferry him out would soon be unable to brave the waters filled with Japanese warships, that the General decided to leave.
I believe that doesn't reflect the behavior of a coward.
 

Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
Yet another character and storyline have been introduced. @Barbaria1 , have you been taking lessons off @Praefectus Praetorio ? At least in this story you have killed off about half of the named individuals, you have sympathy for the brain capacity of your readers.

@old slave brings up a valid point. With so many characters, and with the rapid fire episode-a-day pace of posting for this story, it’s understandable that some may struggle to keep track of who’s who. So I offer here a little help;


Dramatis Personae (arranged in rough order of appearance)

5DD9E0B7-8D67-4639-9D8A-BA963B78732F.jpeg

1st Lieutenant Barbara Ann Moore, ANC
— lead U.S. Army nurse, in charge of 17 nurses assigned to Field Hospital Baker on Bataan. Barb, who is the principal heroine of the story, is a career Army nurse. In her mid-thirties, she takes her responsibility for her younger nurses seriously.

2nd Lieutenant Betty Murphy, ANC — an excitable, buxom, red-headed nurse from New York. She dies in the Balanga Town Hall disaster, along with many other young women forced against their will to service Japanese soldiers there as ‘comfort girls’.

2nd Lieutenant, Kristin Olsen, ANC — a solid, sensibly-minded nurse, tall and fair-haired, from a small Midwestern town, whom Barb looks to as a close reliable friend. Sergeant Kubo has her executed following the discovery of contraband Japanese military scrip in the possession of two other nurses.

Captain Atsushi Tanaka — Staff officer and favorite of General Homma, Commander of the Japanese 14th Army on Bataan. Tanaka is a complicated man. English-speaking and western educated, Tanaka faces internal conflicts between his honorable duty as an officer to family, country and Emperor and his aversion to atrocities of the kind that perpetrated routinely in association with the Bataan Death March.

Sergeant Mitsugi Kubo — the bullying noncom who is placed in charge of Barb and her nurses as they are forced to join the POW columns trudging north to the railhead at San Fernando, and who soon develops a special animosity towards Barb.

1st Lieutenant Bradley Whitaker, Company C, U.S. 45th Infantry Regiment — the surviving ranking officer of his company as it joins the long POW columns heading north. In addition to his determination to do his best for his men, Whitaker develops a protective romantic interest in Barb.

1st Sergeant, Norm Kowalski, Company C, U.S. 45th Infantry Regiment — Whitaker’s level-headed and trusted 1st Sergeant.

Corporal Clem Papeleux, Company C, U.S. 45th Infantry Regiment — Whitaker’s and Norm’s loyal Louisiana-Cajun-born, good-ole-boy, army buddy.

Lieutenant General Masaharu Homma —commander of the Japanese 14th Army on Bataan. An able senior officer who, nonetheless, finds himself and his command undermined by his superiors, as well as his subordinates, who are convinced that he is too lenient with both the local Filipino population and the large numbers of POWs he needs to see removed from the peninsula.

2nd Lieutenants Ginny Price and Maisie Jones, ANC — two of Barb’s youngest nurses who are known to be close friends and nearly inseparable. Sergeant Kubo has them executed together after being strip-searched and found in possession of contraband Japanese military scrip.

2nd Lieutenant Jiro Kinoshita — Sergeant Kubo’s immediate superior, and the officer in charge of shepherding the POWs of the U.S. 45th Regiment up the Peninsula to the railhead at San Fernando.

2nd Lieutenant Natalie Brennan, ANC — bespectacled and serious-minded nurse who becomes close to Barb after Kristin Olsen’s death, and is taken by Kubo, along with Barb and Betty, as ‘offerings’ to the comfort station operating in Balanga’s town hall. Following their escape, Natalie remains faithfully at Barb’s side for much of the rest of the story.

Captain Eiko Sakamoto — the officer in charge of the Japanese army ‘comfort’ station set up in Balanga’s town hall.

Corporal Banko Hendo — 19-year-old lorry driver who waits in queue to rape Barb in the Balanga town hall comfort station, and celebrates his good fortune afterward by lighting up a cigarette outside and touching off the conflagration that destroys the town hall along with the entire center of the town,

Jose Mangahas Balagtas — 73-year-old patriarch of a Balanga Filipino family who discovers Barb and Natalie sheltering in the family’s hen house in the aftermath of the Balanga Town Hall explosion and brings them before his grandson, Alejandro.

Alejandro Balangtas — grandson of Jose and English-speaking Filipino partisan leader, who provides refuge for Barb and Natalie with his partisan band, and masterminds a daring nighttime raid to free POWs from a holding compound outside the town of Lubao.

Sam — elderly partisan left behind to stand watch over Barb and Nora at s makeshift partisan aid station to keep them safe during and after the nighttime raid on the Lubao POW compound.

2nd Lieutenant Nora Heidegger, ANC — a no-nonsense sort, thirty-year-old Michigander who had joined the ANC to escape the stifling parochialism of her small town upbringing and see the world. With Barb, Kristin, and Natalie gone, she emerged as the leader of the surviving nurses and forms an alliance with Whitaker to seek a way to escape. She dies after the breakout when Kubo bayonets her.

2nd Lieutenant Shirley Bell, ANC — the youthful and openly flirtatious,, petite, tawny-haired and green-eyed nurse who plots with Nora Heidegger and Whitaker to use her charms to lure a lonely Private Hiroko Kuto near enough to the Lubao compound wire to overpower him and effect a breakout. He later saves Shirley from being bayoneted by Sergeant Kubo.

Private Hiroko Kuto — Impressionable young member of Sergeant Kubo’s detail who develops a romantic infatuation for Shirley.


Banoy Igcasan — young member of Alejandro’s partisan band sent to stand watch on a lookout post for anyone approaching the partisan camp in the hills above Lubao.

General Count Hisaichi Terauchi — Commander in Chief of Southern Army, headquartered in Saigon, and critic of Homma’s conduct of the campaign on Bataan. Terauchi wants Homma removed from command, and connives tirelessly to make that happen, by petitioning his superiors in Tokyo and actively undermining Homma’s command on the peninsula.

Major Fumihisa Ohno — sycophantic and bumptious underling on General Count Hisaichi Terauchi’s staff, and Trauchi’s chief emissary sent to meddle in Homma’s direction of the 14th Army. Ohno is adept at creating havoc and consternation wherever he turns up.

Private Sadao Sanao — given the duty of executing two American nurses.
 
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Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
22. Bataan Peninsula, somewhere in the hills above Lubao, afternoon of April 15, 1942.

With a weary sigh of resignation, Alejandro made his way across the partisan camp in response to Whitaker’s urgent demand for another strategy meeting. He purposely took his time getting there, arriving to find the American officer squatting, along with two of his men, over a crudely drawn map in the dirt.

“What’s going on?” grunted Alejandro as he knelt down directly across from Whitaker.

“I’ve got a plan.”

“I already told you my orders are to lay low and regroup. You’re wasting your time and mine.”

“Hear me out. I’ve asked my Corporal here, Clem Papeleux, to do a quick headcount. And what did you come up with, Corporal?”

“Well, Lieutenant, ah reckoned we’s got thirty-four of us’n here from the 45th, includin’ you, me’n the Sergeant, and ah counted more an fifty of dem thar part-eee-sans.”

“Right! So, that’s like three big platoons, possibly even four ... a sizable force. Now, that’s not all. I’ve also asked Sergeant Kowalski here to perform a thorough inventory of our weapons and ammunition. And what did you come up with, Sergeant?”

“It’s pretty much a mixed bag, Lieutenant. There are small arms here enough to go around for everyone, but they’re of all makes and vintages. There’s even some captured Jap rifles. So, if there’s a problem it’s not only that we’re a bit short on ammo, but the right kinds. Still we have enough firepower to put on a good show, and a bright spot is that these partisans appear to have gotten their hands on a Jap mortar and around a dozen rounds for it.”

“Good!” concluded Whitaker, “It’s enough I think to do something significant. So here’s the plan.”

“There is no plan!” snapped Alejandro, getting abruptly up to leave. “I said before that we are going to lay low now. That’s it!”

“Fuck, just sit down, shut up and listen!”

******************

Shirley had been following Hiroko at a distance as he led the way up into the highlands. She had come around to placing her trust in this strange little man, convincing herself that the fact that he had raped earlier was because he had been given no choice. She could hardly blame him for following orders. She also gave solace to herself by noting his protective kindness and devotion to her.

Shirley couldn't be sure about what would happen to them, but whatever it was, she had a sense that somehow things were going to turn out okay. Shirley had always tried to be optimistic about things. And looking skyward, she noted that the day had turned to be as sunny and bright as she had begun to feel.

But as she lowered her gaze to him up ahead, she found reason to pause , for Hiroko had raised his hand in caution, signaling a halt. She saw him crouch down. So she did the same and listened intently.

At first all she could hear was the buzzing of insects, but no ... there were voices ... people up ahead ... not a few ... but a good many voices. And the voices were raised, as if in argument.

A thrill ran through her. Those voices ... they were speaking English!

Impulsively she rushed forward, taking Hiroko by the hand to drag him along with her.

But he balked, his face registering uncertainty.

“Come on!” she cried impatiently. “We did it! We’re saved!”

*************

Major Ohno emerged from one of the row of corrugated metal huts located just outside the Lubao compound wire. His sleeves were rolled above his elbows. His shirt was open. Its front, his chest, pants and forearms were spattered with blood. His face was flushed, his eyes flashing.

“Bring me two more POWs!” he shouted at Lieutenant Kinoshita, who was standing nervously nearby. “And take these two out and shoot them. I’m through with them.”

“Were you unable to get anything useful out of them, Major?” asked Kinoshita.

“Some. They talked. Your interpreter’s skills leave something to be desired, Kinoshita. Nonetheless, I believe what we got out of those two Americans was that a certain Lieutenant Whitaker was the mastermind behind last night’s breakout and that he was one of the escapees. There’s also the suggestion that one of our soldiers ... one of your own men, Kinoshita ... may have assisted them.”

“Well, I seriously doubt that ...”

“It’s not your job to doubt, Kinoshita! This is far from over. I intend to find out more. Any idea who among your men might have been involved?”

“Might have been Sergeant Kubo,” suggested Kinoshita, seizing on the opportunity, for the sake of his men, to deflect any blame that Ohno might try to levy onto someone who was dead. Kubo, after all, had been absent without leave right up until the time of the breakout.

“But, wasn't it Kubo who you said organized and led the pursuit?”

“Yes, but as you’ll recall, Major, the pursuit yielded very little in results.”

“Point taken, Lieutenant. Now do as I order, and bring me two more prisoners. These Americans do not stand up to torture well. They are a weak race. Show them a little pain and they cringe and whimper like babies! I need more to interrogate. And be quick about it!”

“Yessir.”

************

As Tanaka reached the outskirts of Lubao he debated whether it would be best to go straight to the center and report to General Homma, or take the road that led to the POW holding compound to the south of town. He would have preferred reporting to Homma, but the fact that he had two naked female POWs with him in the lorry cab would be rather awkward, and potentially an embarrassment the General hardly needed.

So he took the turn that skirted the town and led to the compound, with the idea that he would seek out Kinoshita there and leave the nurses with him. He would report to Kinoshita that the blocking position up in the hills was in place, that he fully expected it to yield results, and that he had chosen to return early with these two re-captured female nurses. Further, he would recommend that Kinoshita find them something to wear and release them inside the compound.

Then he, Tanaka, would return the comfort of his billet in Lubao and a much anticipated reunion with the comfort girl of his dreams.

But, alas, it was not to be. When Tanaka pulled up to the compound gate, he found Kinoshita busy overseeing the execution of a pair of American POWs, who had been stripped of their clothing, bound, blindfolded, lined up and kneeling, waiting to be shot. The men were in terrible shape ... bloody and broken. They appeared to have been thoroughly beaten and bludgeoned.

Tanaka glanced at Barb and Natalie, who appeared to show no signs of coming around anytime soon, and even if they did, given their condition, they would likely be far too groggy and disoriented to cause any immediate trouble. He figured he could safely leave them for awhile.

Disengaging himself from Barb, who had been leaning against him, he opened the door to the cab and slipped out just in time to see the POWs shot by Kinoshita, first one then the other, a bullet from his handgun in the backs of each their heads.

On seeing Tanaka, Kinoshita, who had been looking rather grim, brightened and rushed over to him quickly.

“Afternoon, Lieutenant,” said Tanaka amiably, offering a casual salute in response to Kinoshita’s correct one. “Looks as though you’ve experienced some trouble here? Those men you’ve just executed have all the appearances of having been in some kind of late night brawl.”

“Well, Sir ... truth is ....”

Kinoshita’s explanation was cut short by the sudden appearance of Major Ohno, who had emerged from the nearby hut where he had been carrying out his interrogations, to shout, “Kinoshita! Over here on the double. There’s two more inside who deserve a bullet in the head.”

Then, on spotting Tanaka, he barked, “and who is this?”

“Captain Tanaka, Sir,” replied Kinoshita, “Back from the hills. Remember? I told you about him earlier. He went up there to set up a blocking position to cut off and recapture the escapees.”

“Ah yes, of course. Well, Tanaka, tell me ... have you been successful? How many escapees have you killed or captured? And where are they? Is there a Lieutenant Whitaker among them?”

“My men are in position, Major. They had begun to bag some escapees by around the time I left. I imagine they have captured many more by now, In fact, I am on my way to report to Lieutenant General Homma on our success,” said Tanaka who had instantly recognized the blood-spattered officer as Major Ohno. Tanaka had met him once before at Homma’s headquarters and knew of his reputation for being an arrogant self-serving toad ... with a talent for meddling. The man, though stupid and self-important, was dangerous and not to be trifled with.

“Very good. I’m sure Homma will be pleased to know that you are successfully covering for his incompetence.”

Tanaka said nothing and hoped his face did not reveal his contempt.

“Now, before you go, Tanaka, tell me who’s in the cab of that lorry?” demanded Ohno, having spotted movement behind the windscreen.


381D655D-4D30-407F-AB9C-EF86E2A26B87.jpeg

Tanaka had to think fast. What should he answer?

But it really didn’t matter, because at that moment the cab door swung open, and a long bare feminine leg appeared. Moments later, Barb slipped to the ground, clutched at the cab door for support, blinked at the bright light, and took two unsteady steps forward before sinking to her knees.

8076BD53-07EF-48C3-8F4D-8D11D1F9116B.jpeg
 
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Fossy

Tribune
22. Bataan Peninsula, somewhere in the hills above Lubao, afternoon of April 15, 1942.

With a weary sigh of resignation, Alejandro made his way across the partisan camp in response to Whitaker’s urgent demand for another strategy meeting. He purposely took his time getting there, arriving to find the American officer squatting, along with two of his men, over a crudely drawn map in the dirt.

“What’s going on?” grunted Alejandro as he knelt down directly across from Whitaker.

“I’ve got a plan.”

“I already told you my orders are to lay low and regroup. You’re wasting your time and mine.”

“Hear me out. I’ve asked my Corporal here, Clem Papeleux, to do a quick headcount. And what did you come up with, Corporal?”

“Well, Lieutenant, ah reckoned we’s got thirty-four of us’n here from the 45th, includin’ you, me’n the Sergeant, and ah counted more an fifty of dem thar part-eee-sans.”

“Right! So, that’s like three big platoons, possibly even four ... a sizable force. Now, that’s not all. I’ve also asked Sergeant Kowalski here to perform a thorough inventory of our weapons and ammunition. And what did you come up with, Sergeant?”

“It’s pretty much a mixed bag, Lieutenant. There are small arms here enough to go around for everyone, but they’re of all makes and vintages. There’s even some captured Jap rifles. So, if there’s a problem it’s not only that we’re a bit short on ammo, but the right kinds. Still we have enough firepower to put on a good show, and a bright spot is that these partisans appear to have gotten their hands on a Jap mortar and around a dozen rounds for it.”

“Good!” concluded Whitaker, “It’s enough I think to do something significant. So here’s the plan.”

“There is no plan!” snapped Alejandro, getting abruptly up to leave. “I said before that we are going to lay low now. That’s it!”

“Fuck, just sit down, shut up and listen!”

******************

Shirley had been following Hiroko at a distance as he led the way up into the highlands. She had come around to placing her trust in this strange little man, convincing herself that the fact that he had raped earlier was because he had been given no choice. She could hardly blame him for following orders. She also gave solace to herself by noting his protective kindness and devotion to her.

Shirley couldn't be sure about what would happen to them, but whatever it was, she had a sense that somehow things were going to turn out okay. Shirley had always tried to be optimistic about things. And looking skyward, she noted that the day had turned to be as sunny and bright as she had begun to feel.

But as she lowered her gaze to him up ahead, she found reason to pause , for Hiroko had raised his hand in caution, signaling a halt. She saw him crouch down. So she did the same and listened intently.

At first all she could hear was the buzzing of insects, but no ... there were voices ... people up ahead ... not a few ... but a good many voices. And the voices were raised, as if in argument.

A thrill ran through her. Those voices ... they were speaking English!

Impulsively she rushed forward, taking Hiroko by the hand to drag him along with her.

But he balked, his face registering uncertainty.

“Come on!” she cried impatiently. “We did it! We’re saved!”

*************

Major Ohno emerged from one of the row of corrugated metal huts located just outside the Lubao compound wire. His sleeves were rolled above his elbows. His shirt was open. Its front, his chest, pants and forearms were spattered with blood. His face was flushed, his eyes flashing.

“Bring me two more POWs!” he shouted at Lieutenant Kinoshita, who was standing nervously nearby. “And take these two out and shoot them. I’m through with them.”

“Were you unable to get anything useful out of them, Major?” asked Kinoshita.

“Some. They talked. Your interpreter’s skills leave something to be desired, Kinoshita. Nonetheless, I believe what we got out of those two Americans was that a certain Lieutenant Whitaker was the mastermind behind last night’s breakout and that he was one of the escapees. There’s also the suggestion that one of our soldiers ... one of your own men, Kinoshita ... may have assisted them.”

“Well, I seriously doubt that ...”

“It’s not your job to doubt, Kinoshita! This is far from over. I intend to find out more. Any idea who among your men might have been involved?”

“Might have been Sergeant Kubo,” suggested Kinoshita, seizing on the opportunity, for the sake of his men, to deflect any blame that Ohno might try to levy onto someone who was dead. Kubo, after all, had been absent without leave right up until the time of the breakout.

“But, wasn't it Kubo who you said organized and led the pursuit?”

“Yes, but as you’ll recall, Major, the pursuit yielded very little in results.”

“Point taken, Lieutenant. Now do as I order, and bring me two more prisoners. These Americans do not stand up to torture well. They are a weak race. Show them a little pain and they cringe and whimper like babies! I need more to interrogate. And be quick about it!”

“Yessir.”

************

As Tanaka reached the outskirts of Lubao he debated whether it would be best to go straight to the center and report to General Homma, or take the road that led to the POW holding compound to the south of town. He would have preferred reporting to Homma, but the fact that he had two naked female POWs with him in the lorry cab would be rather awkward, and potentially an embarrassment the General hardly needed.

So he took the turn that skirted the town and led to the compound, with the idea that he would seek out Kinoshita there and leave the nurses with him. He would report to Kinoshita that the blocking position up in the hills was in place, that he fully expected it to yield results, and that he had chosen to return early with these two re-captured female nurses. Further, he would recommend that Kinoshita find them something to wear and release them inside the compound.

Then he, Tanaka, would return the comfort of his billet in Lubao and a much anticipated reunion with the comfort girl of his dreams.

But, alas, it was not to be. When Tanaka pulled up to the compound gate, he found Kinoshita busy overseeing the execution of a pair of American POWs, who had been stripped of their clothing, bound, blindfolded, lined up and kneeling, waiting to be shot. The men were in terrible shape ... bloody and broken. They appeared to have been thoroughly beaten and bludgeoned.

Tanaka glanced at Barb and Natalie, who appeared to show no signs of coming around anytime soon, and even if they did, given their condition, they would likely be far too groggy and disoriented to cause any immediate trouble. He figured he could safely leave them for awhile.

Disengaging himself from Barb, who had been leaning against him, he opened the door to the cab and slipped out just in time to see the POWs shot by Kinoshita, first one then the other, a bullet from his handgun in the backs of each their heads.

On seeing Tanaka, Kinoshita, who had been looking rather grim, brightened and rushed over to him quickly.

“Afternoon, Lieutenant,” said Tanaka amiably, offering a casual salute in response to Kinoshita’s correct one. “Looks as though you’ve experienced some trouble here? Those men you’ve just executed have all the appearances of having been in some kind of late night brawl.”

“Well, Sir ... truth is ....”

Kinoshita’s explanation was cut short by the sudden appearance of Major Ohno, who had emerged from the nearby hut where he had been carrying out his interrogations, to shout, “Kinoshita! Over here on the double. There’s two more inside who deserve a bullet in the head.”

Then, on spotting Tanaka, he barked, “and who is this?”

“Captain Tanaka, Sir,” replied Kinoshita, “Back from the hills. Remember? I told you about him earlier. He went up there to set up a blocking position to cut off and recapture the escapees.”

“Ah yes, of course. Well, Tanaka, tell me ... have you been successful? How many escapees have you killed or captured? And where are they? Is there a Lieutenant Whitaker among them?”

“My men are in position, Major. They had begun to bag some escapees by around the time I left. I imagine they have captured many more by now, In fact, I am on my way to report to Lieutenant General Homma on our success,” said Tanaka who had instantly recognized the blood-spattered officer as Major Ohno. Tanaka had met him once before at Homma’s headquarters and knew of his reputation for being an arrogant self-serving toad ... with a talent for meddling. The man, though stupid and self-important, was dangerous and not to be trifled with.

“Very good. I’m sure Homma will be pleased to know that you are successfully covering for his incompetence.”

Tanaka said nothing and hoped his face did not reveal his contempt.

“Now, before you go, Tanaka, tell me who’s in the cab of that lorry?” demanded Ohno, having spotted movement behind the windscreen.

Tanaka had to think fast. What should he answer?


But it really didn’t matter, because at that moment the cab door swung open, and a long bare feminine leg appeared. Moments later, Barb slipped to the ground, clutched at the cab door for support, blinked at the bright light, and took two unsteady steps forward before sinking to her knees.
Oh dear Barb ... she just doesn't help herself ... looking forward very much to seeing what happens next! ;) ...
 

Madiosi

Depictor of Dreams
Staff member
“Now, before you go, Tanaka, tell me who’s in the cab of that lorry?” demanded Ohno, having spotted movement behind the windscreen.

Tanaka had to think fast. What should he answer?

But it really didn’t matter, because at that moment the cab door swung open, and a long bare feminine leg appeared. Moments later, Barb slipped to the ground, clutched at the cab door for support, blinked at the bright light, and took two unsteady steps forward before sinking to her knees.

Madiosi-2021-031-Bataan21.jpg
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
With so many characters, and with the rapid fire episode-a-day pace of posting for this story, it’s understandable that some may struggle to keep track of who’s who. So I offer here a little help;
Glad to see you are learning from my excellent examples here, Barb!
“I’ve got a plan.”
Ohno - that sounds bad.
Shirley couldn't be sure about what would happen to them, but whatever it was, she had a sense that somehow things were going to turn out okay. Shirley had always tried to be optimistic about things. And looking skyward, she noted that the day had turned to be as sunny and bright as she had begun to feel.
God - I'm falling in love with Shirley. With her bobbed blonde hair and cheerful optimism, she reminds me of someone. Yes! Amanda! :icon12:
“Come on!” she cried impatiently. “We did it! We’re saved!”
Why is my heart in my throat with worry?
Show them a little pain and they cringe and whimper like babies! I need more to interrogate.
Gotta love the Major.:mad:
The man, though stupid and self-important, was dangerous and not to be trifled with.
That kind is often the most dangerous.
Moments later, Barb slipped to the ground, clutched at the cab door for support, blinked at the bright light, and took two unsteady steps forward before sinking to her knees.
Does the expression, "Out of the frying pan and into the fire," seem appropriate here? I am very worried for poor Barb.:icon_popcorn:

Again, an outstanding episode, Barb. (That word is a problem. Since every episode has been remarkably excellent, it is impossible for any to be truly outstanding!). You are back building suspense and tension to such a level, that I'm sweating even in frigid weather.:clapping::clapping::clapping:
 

Fossy

Tribune
Glad to see you are learning from my excellent examples here, Barb!

Ohno - that sounds bad.

God - I'm falling in love with Shirley. With her bobbed blonde hair and cheerful optimism, she reminds me of someone. Yes! Amanda! :icon12:

Why is my heart in my throat with worry?

Gotta love the Major.:mad:

That kind is often the most dangerous.

Does the expression, "Out of the frying pan and into the fire," seem appropriate here? I am very worried for poor Barb.:icon_popcorn:

Again, an outstanding episode, Barb. (That word is a problem. Since every episode has been remarkably excellent, it is impossible for any to be truly outstanding!). You are back building suspense and tension to such a level, that I'm sweating even in frigid weather.:clapping::clapping::clapping:
Honestly I thought exactly the same about Shirley in that she reminded me of Amanda. I think it is the light coloured Bob that does it
 
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