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Cam's Camera: Mythology

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phlebas

PRIMUS POENUS
Staff member
They're pretty crap at foreplay, a bit of neck-biting's all the girl would get!

Eul, that rather sounds like you're speaking from experience . . . . . . gods or swans?
 

CamCrux

Executioner
One of my early attempts at mythological illustration : the Judgement of Paris.

The Judgement of Paris.png
This careful, scientifically supported reconstruction departs somewhat from traditional representations of the goddesses and shows them as they really were.
Paris is seen here giving the golden apple to Aphrodite, whon he chose as the winner of the contest.

Athena (left) is an intelligent and mischievous young goddess, though loaded with wisdom ; she is both appalled and amused at Paris's silly choice.
Hera (center) has the sturdy character that befits the wife of Zeus, an unrepentant womanizer and goddessizer ; she is clearly not thrilled with Paris's judgement and will side with the Greeks, along with Athena, in the future war with Troy.
Aphrodite (right) knows what she's worth in men's (and woman's) eyes and can sometimes be a little smug about it.

The character of Paris is a 3D creation due to the talent of emarukk of DA. May the gods and goddesses on Olympus bless him and grant him long life and a happy reign !
Connaisseurs will have identified Altea in the role of Athena, Katya Clover as Hera, and Little Caprice as Aphrodite. May the all-powerful gods bless them too !
 
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Migoz2

Senator
One of my early attempts at mythological illustration : the Judgement of Paris.

View attachment 935152
This careful, scientifically supported reconstruction departs somewhat from traditional representations of the goddesses and shows them as they really were.
Paris is seen here giving the golden apple to Aphrodite, whon he chose as the winner of the contest.

Athena (left) is an intelligent and mischievous young goddess, though loaded with wisdom ; she is both appalled and amused at Paris's silly choice.
Hera (center) has the sturdy character that befits the wife of Zeus, an unrepentant womanizer and goddessizer ; she is clearly not thrilled with Paris's judgement and will side with the Greeks, along with Athena, in the future war with Troy.
Aphrodite (right) knows what she's worth in men's (and woman's) eyes and can sometimes be a little smug about it.

The character of Paris is a 3D creation due to the talent of emarukk of DA. May the gods and goddesses on Olympus bless him and grant him long life and a happy reign !
Connaisseurs will have identified Altea in the role of Athena, Katya Clover as Hera, and Little Caprice as Aphrodite. May the all-powerful gods bless them too !
I have always loved this image of yours.

Also, it scientifically proves that @Barbaria1 was responsible for the Trojan War.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
One of my early attempts at mythological illustration : the Judgement of Paris.

View attachment 935152
This careful, scientifically supported reconstruction departs somewhat from traditional representations of the goddesses and shows them as they really were.
Paris is seen here giving the golden apple to Aphrodite, whon he chose as the winner of the contest.

Athena (left) is an intelligent and mischievous young goddess, though loaded with wisdom ; she is both appalled and amused at Paris's silly choice.
Hera (center) has the sturdy character that befits the wife of Zeus, an unrepentant womanizer and goddessizer ; she is clearly not thrilled with Paris's judgement and will side with the Greeks, along with Athena, in the future war with Troy.
Aphrodite (right) knows what she's worth in men's (and woman's) eyes and can sometimes be a little smug about it.

The character of Paris is a 3D creation due to the talent of emarukk of DA. May the gods and goddesses on Olympus bless him and grant him long life and a happy reign !
Connaisseurs will have identified Altea in the role of Athena, Katya Clover as Hera, and Little Caprice as Aphrodite. May the all-powerful gods bless them too !
The Judgement of Paris has inspired such a range of artists that an entire thread could be devoted to it. The concept of a young Prince being offered the opportunity to judge the beauty of three Goddesses sounds heaven-sent. But things aren't always what they seem. Paris is too young and jejune to realize that a mortal getting into a contest of the Gods would surely be dangerous. But the Greek myth also included a wonderful element of cynicism. The contest would not be decided on the basis of beauty but on the basis of bribes. Hera promised to make Paris King of all men; Athena promised him to be the strongest mortal and the greatest warrior; Aphrodite promised him the most beautiful woman in the world as his wife.
Paris, being a typical man, did not hesitate but chose the third - Helen of Troy!
 

Zungur

Magistrate
Well, it being a Greek myth, naturally the contesters are trying to bribe (check Pelops and the founding of Olympian Games).
The interesting detail (betraying maybe partly non-Greek roots of this myth) is that Paris does *not* decide on the basis of bribes, but awards the price to the goddess who is least powerful but certainly the most beautiful (don't tell me that a grumpy Milf and a prissy smart aleck could be competitive with Aphrodite!).
So Paris (stupid non-Greek barbarian) is honest and not letting himself being bribed and consequently disaster follows.
That's the true moral of the story.
 

bobinder

ARTISAN
One of my early attempts at mythological illustration : the Judgement of Paris.

The Judgement of Paris.png
Very interesting casting!
Good to see Altea again, it has been a whilesince she was active.
Another charming scene from Greek mythology, captured for posterity by Cam's camera! As noted on DeviantArt earlier this year, this is an attractive interpretation of the famous contest, portraying Barb (Caprice) as the Femme Fatale who precipitated the Trojan War! The research has evidently paid off, since the goddesses look most convincing - even familiar - and the composition with a 3D figure for Paris works quite effectively, emarukk being an accomplished master of high quality, exotic figure production.

Figure scale, lighting, colour balance and saturation are all finely adjusted to present visual consistency and a convincing record of the proceedings. The poses and expressions work together very well. Katty and Caprice are now established as regular performers in Kamerijk productions, although I think this may be a debut for Altea?

I understand that Altea was the second choice for the role of Athena, due to lighting inconsistencies in the original figure pose, modelled by Alice. Whilst this may seem a sadly missed opportunity for Alice, it often happens that we are obliged to make a new search for suitable sources if the components are not blending together successfully, and meanwhile the manipulation lingers in a partially completed state. Ultimately, Altea's resemblance to Caprice provides a further element of symmetry to the composition, as well as the required lighting consistency, so all is well in the final result. Well done yet again, Kam! :)
 

Naraku

Draconarius
Each goddess offered a bribe according to her nature.
Hera, queen of the gods, offered to make Paris the ruler of the known world.
Athena, goddess of wisdom, offered to make him the wisest of all men.
Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty, offered to give him the most beautiful woman in the world.
Being a typical male, Paris chose sex.
But, gifts of the gods usually come with a catch. In this case, the most beautiful woman in the world was already married to the king of Sparta, so Paris had to get her to run off with him, thereby starting the Trojan War.
And, of course, the Greeks - and later writers like Shakespeare - put the blame on Helen instead of Paris or Aphrodite.
If Paris had been a bit smarter and bit less horny, he would have realized that Athena was making the best offer. As the smartest man in the world, he could have gained the power to rule the world and then could have his choice of women.
 

Baron Von Sade

Governor
Each goddess offered a bribe according to her nature.
Hera, queen of the gods, offered to make Paris the ruler of the known world.
Athena, goddess of wisdom, offered to make him the wisest of all men.
Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty, offered to give him the most beautiful woman in the world.
Being a typical male, Paris chose sex.
But, gifts of the gods usually come with a catch. In this case, the most beautiful woman in the world was already married to the king of Sparta, so Paris had to get her to run off with him, thereby starting the Trojan War.
And, of course, the Greeks - and later writers like Shakespeare - put the blame on Helen instead of Paris or Aphrodite.
If Paris had been a bit smarter and bit less horny, he would have realized that Athena was making the best offer. As the smartest man in the world, he could have gained the power to rule the world and then could have his choice of women.
I fact, according to the mythology, Paris made the moral choice. It wasn't sex it was supposed to be love.

Also, Athena offered victory in battle, not wisdom.
 

Zungur

Magistrate
If Paris had been a bit smarter and bit less horny, he would have realized that Athena was making the best offer. As the smartest man in the world, he could have gained the power to rule the world and then could have his choice of women.
As the smartest man in the world, understanding everything about the ways of mankind, he would immediately have fallen into despair and depression and comitted suizide ...
 

CamCrux

Executioner
... But the Greek myth also included a wonderful element of cynicism. The contest would not be decided on the basis of beauty but on the basis of bribes. Hera promised to make Paris King of all men; Athena promised him to be the strongest mortal and the greatest warrior; Aphrodite promised him the most beautiful woman in the world as his wife.
Paris, being a typical man, did not hesitate but chose the third - Helen of Troy!
For the uneducated masses of DA I felt I had to evoke this point. I'm glad to see that on the more knowledgeable habitués of Cruxforums no such popularization is needed ! :kiss:
 

CamCrux

Executioner
Danae.png
A new rendition of the Greek myth of Danaë and the Rain of Gold, by no means a match for Correggio's, Titian's, Rembrandt's or Klimt's masterpieces, but claiming to greater realism and accuracy.

The oracle at Delphi had told King Acrisius of Argos that he would be killed by his daughter Danae's son. Danae was childless at the time and understandably her father intended her to remain so. Consequently he had her shut her up in a tower of his palace. The room had a small window but the door had been sealed. Somehow they found a way to feed the unfortunate girl and keep her alive.

However this was without taking Zeus into account. The king of the gods, who desired Danae (as he did most women divine and mortal), managed to come to her in the form of a golden rain through the narrow opening. Nine months later baby Perseus was born.

Years later the oracle's prophecy came true, as it must. Perseus went to Larissa where athletic games were being held. By chance (or rather by the Fates' command), old Acrisius was there and Perseus accidentally struck him on the head with his javelin ...
 

bobinder

ARTISAN
Danae.png
A new rendition of the Greek myth of Danaë and the Rain of Gold, by no means a match for Correggio's, Titian's, Rembrandt's or Klimt's masterpieces, but claiming to greater realism and accuracy.
Thanks for demonstrating how Zeus achieved this particular conquest. Whilst this illustrates a spectacular failure of the 'lock up your daughters' strategy, Danae might have been just a little suspicious of the golden rain, until she realised it was only Zeus engaging in one of his unique courtship rituals. ;)

I cannot identify the model this time, but her pose is effective and the lighting of the figure corresponds with the location of the window. The Grecian urn reflects the colouring of the bedsheet as well as the theme of the lady reclining on a bed. The decoration appears to include some drops of rain falling in the appropriate direction. This is the kind of detailed symbolism which also appears in your 'Leda and the Swan' - and yet again your translucent logo echoes the dominant colours in the picture. Nice work, Kam! :)
 

CamCrux

Executioner
I cannot identify the model this time, but her pose is effective and the lighting of the figure corresponds with the location of the window.
I can't help, I'm afraid, as I was careless enougn to lose the reference. If someone can help identify the young lady I'll be glad and thankful :)
The Grecian urn reflects the colouring of the bedsheet as well as the theme of the lady reclining on a bed. The decoration appears to include some drops of rain falling in the appropriate direction. This is the kind of detailed symbolism which also appears in your 'Leda and the Swan'
The urn - original or copy, again I cannot say - actually depicts in a somewhat stylized fashion the episode of Danae's "seduction" by Zeus.
- and yet again your translucent logo echoes the dominant colours in the picture. Nice work, Kam! :)
That is pure luck, but thanks again for your supportive comment Bob :)
 
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