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Crucifixion;other Position On The Cross

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vbanksto

Magistrate
Hum, not evident ...:oops:
As to the harsh realities of death on the cross forum members tend to forget a few things.
First is simple ecomomic consideratiions. The queastors of the Treasury were notoriously parsimonious
the senate and people of Rome wanted pirates bandits and rebels zDEAD.How they got that was irrelevant. torture wasnt a consiideration forthe denarius counters
Cheap executions were desirable. Nails cosg more than rope. Comex crosses costy more. S great consideration was the inherent laziness of provincial soldiers who were paid thhe same whatever they did. Provincial officiials werent spending their own precciious gold!
anyone who' commanded sooldiers lnows they tend to follow the path of least resistance.
 
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Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
coomplex crosses costy more. S great consideration was the inherent laziness of provincial soldiers who were paid thhe same whatever they did. Provincial officiials werent spending their own precciious gold!
anyone who' commanded sooldiers lnows they tend to follow the path of least resistance.

Interesting. You are right vbanksto.....economics drives everything in our world, doesn't it?....surely a feature of crucifixion we often neglect.
 

Primus pilus

Magister Australis
Interesting. You are right vbanksto.....economics drives everything in our world, doesn't it?....surely a feature of crucifixion we often neglect.
Apart from the extravagance of the entertainment in the arena and in every major games since Pp suspects it has always been thus.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
anyone who' commanded soldiers knows they tend to follow the path of least resistance.
good point vbanksto: the poet David Jones - whose book-length 'In Parenthesis' captures better than anything else I know the 'feel' of being an ordinary private soldier in WW I - wrote 'The Fatigue' about the party of troops detailed to crucify Christ. Like all of Jones's poetry, it's quite complex, full of allusions to Catholic liturgy, Classical literature, Celtic and Norse mythology, etc., yet it conveys the earthy, making-the-best-of-a-lousy-job attitude of typical squaddies and n.c.o.s. Here's an extract -

And others of you to be detailed
(not on other fatigues)
for the spectacle
at the sixth hour
in Supplementary Orders
not yet drafted
for the speculatores

those who handle the instruments
who are the instruments
to hang the gleaming Trophy
on the Dreaming tree
and to see
on the leaning lignum
the spolia-bloom
where shine the Five Phalerae
that till the hard war
and for his racked-out limbs
(extensis manibus...)
the dark-bright armillae
Quis est vir qui habet coronam?

for the spined-dark wreath
squalentam barbam
without the circuit-wall
of his own patria.
Where the Spoil of Spoils
hangs to Iuppiter
and the trophies
are the Conqueror
...himself to himself
on the Windy Tree.

Perhaps they'll serve you the heavier pick, the pounding tamper,
the spoil-shovels, the heavy maul,
the securing tackle
of purchase, of lift, of haul
of stay
against a Fall.
It is weighty impedimenta
that belongs to Laverna's crux-gear,
it's no light-fatigue
you're in for.
 

vbanksto

Magistrate
good point vbanksto: the poet David Jones - whose book-length 'In Parenthesis' captures bette
r than anything else I know the 'feel' of being an ordinary private soldier in WW I - wrote 'The Fatigue' about the party of troops detailed to crucify Christ. Like all of Jones's poetry, it's quite complex, full of allusions to Catholic liturgy, Classical literature, Celtic and Norse mythology, etc., yet it conveys the earthy, making-the-best-of-a-lousy-job attitude of typical squaddies and n.c.o.s. Here's an extract -

And others of you to be detailed
(not on other fatigues)
for the spectacle
at the sixth hour
in Supplementary Orders
not yet drafted
for the speculatores

those who handle the instruments
who are the instruments
to hang the gleaming Trophy
on the Dreaming tree
and to see
on the leaning lignum
the spolia-bloom
where shine the Five Phalerae
that till the hard war
and for his racked-out limbs
(extensis manibus...)
the dark-bright armillae
Quis est vir qui habet coronam?

for the spined-dark wreath
squalentam barbam
without the circuit-wall
of his own patria.
Where the Spoil of Spoils
hangs to Iuppiter
and the trophies
are the Conqueror
...himself to himself
on the Windy Tree.

Perhaps they'll serve you the heavier pick, the pounding tamper,
the spoil-shovels, the heavy maul,
the securing tackle
of purchase, of lift, of haul
of stay
against a Fall.
It is weighty impedimenta
that belongs to Laverna's crux-gear,
it's no light-fatigue
you're in for.
e
good point vbanksto: the poet David Jones - whose book-length 'In Parenthesis' captures better than anything else I know the 'feel' of being an ordinary private soldier in WW I - wrote 'The Fatigue' about the party of troops detailed to crucify Christ. Like all of Jones's poetry, it's quite complex, full of allusions to Catholic liturgy, Classical literature, Celtic and Norse mythology, etc., yet it conveys the earthy, making-the-best-of-a-lousy-job attitude of typical squaddies and n.c.o.s. Here's an extract -

And others of you to be detailed
(not on other fatigues)
for the spectacle
at the sixth hour
in Supplementary Orders
not yet drafted
for the speculatores

those who handle the instruments
who are the instruments
to hang the gleaming Trophy
on the Dreaming tree
and to see
on the leaning lignum
the spolia-bloom
where shine the Five Phalerae
that till the hard war
and for his racked-out limbs
(extensis manibus...)
the dark-bright armillae
Quis est vir qui habet coronam?

for the spined-dark wreath
squalentam barbam
without the circuit-wall
of his own patria.
Where the Spoil of Spoils
hangs to Iuppiter
and the trophies
are the Conqueror
...himself to himself
on the Windy Tree.

Perhaps they'll serve you the heavier pick, the pounding tamper,
the spoil-shovels, the heavy maul,
the securing tackle
of purchase, of lift, of haul
of stay
against a Fall.
It is weighty impedimenta
that belongs to Laverna's crux-gear,
it's no light-fatigue
you're in for.
eul many thanks
i dont suppose you have rhe books ISBN numbers
 

vbanksto

Magistrate
Interesting. You are right vbanksto.....economics drives everything in our world, doesn't it?....surely a feature of crucifixion we often neglect.
barb thats why hanging was so popular. execution by unskkilledd labor. all you need is a tree a rope with a noose and some poor dumb bastards nneck to stretch
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
e

eul many thanks
i dont suppose you have rhe books ISBN numbers
the copy I've got dates from before ISBN were invented. It's in
The Sleeping Lord and other Fragments Faber, London 1974
A quick check on Amazon shows it on offer in paperback from UK sources @ £4 upwards,
hardback from £8 up, though a good mint copy could cost over £90.
The same Amazon page shows In Parenthesis at similar lowish prices in pb or used hb.
 

vbanksto

Magistrate
the copy I've got dates from before ISBN were invented. It's in
The Sleeping Lord and other Fragments Faber, London 1974
A quick check on Amazon shows it on offer in paperback from UK sources @ £4 upwards,
hardback from £8 up, though a good mint copy could cost over £90.
The same Amazon page shows In Parenthesis at similar lowish prices in pb or used hb.
bless ewe fair and virtuous .aiden. i ffigured oy aa brit would refer to ORs

as squaddies.
bless ewe fair and virtuous .aiden. i ffigured oy aa brit would refer to ORs
back in New Orleans we have a rather nice street named after the most odious ahole brit military history-Dougie Haig

e
as squaddies.

back in New Orleans we have a rather nice street named after the most odious ahole brit military history-Dougie Haig
ulalia as a stafffie can you set me up wif an avatar? i cant manage it meself
 
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thehangingtree

Proconsul
Staff member
barb thats why hanging was so popular. execution by unskkilledd labor. all you need is a tree a rope with a noose and some poor dumb bastards nneck to stretch
THT resents being called unskilled labor...

Tree
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
e

ulalia as a stafffie can you set me up wif an avatar? i cant manage it meself
I ought to be able to, but I've tried and for some reason haven't managed.
What is your problem?
Are you using a phone, so you can't download a picture you like from the net
then upload it here for your avatar?
 

vbanksto

Magistrate
this being the second decade of Century 21 im trying to participate on a ce

cellie which explains my rancid spelling!
 
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Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
I thought so! :D
Well, I'll have another try tomorrow, but the best way will be for you get to a computer with a hard disk,
surf the net for a pic you like (or a few, in case some don't fit the size limits),
then put your cursor on your name at top right, click 'Avatar', and then click 'choose image'
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Ha! I've managed it! :p

Hope you like your new avatar -
it's an image by our late, great, Makar.
 

vbanksto

Magistrate
obless ewe. as an adherent of The Campbell I appreciate your rich Celtic imagerry. art thou an Oxbridge product perchance?
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
perchance! :p
 
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