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Latin required....

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Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
Hiya y'all...who in this forum is any good at writing things in LATIN ??
Anybody willing to help ?? Please P.M me... Thanks.. safe crux

Check in with Eulalia
 

markus

Governor
Hiya y'all...who in this forum is any good at writing things in LATIN ??
Anybody willing to help ?? Please P.M me... Thanks.. safe crux

I've studied it. I can still read something in Latin. But it is important to learn the Italian language well, the construction of the Italian phrase, the etymology of words. It does not serve for English, even if there are English words that come from the Latin. Street-strata, Bath-Balneo, fact-factum, long-longa, animal-animalis.etc ..
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Understand that Latin is a much more inflected language than English. Therefore, words change depending on how they are used. Example: I, me, mine.
A traitor, male, is a proditor, female - proditrix meaning someone who gives over (to the enemy)
High treason is somewhat ideomatic (unique) in English, Latin words for treason are very context dependent. One is tradition, meaning handing over information (to the enemy). Also Maiestas, (from which majesty comes - change the i to a j) meaning both dignity and treason - go figure!.
Praise the emperor - that is easy a stock phrase in Latin: Ave Caesar
Cheers - if a wild crowd cheering, then there is no clear word, like a modern sports crowd whopping it up. The formal words are Ave (hail, greetings) and Vale (be well, greetings). If you mean a toast before drinking, Gaudete (be joyful) works well
 

Baracus

Rectidolor
Understand that Latin is a much more inflected language than English. Therefore, words change depending on how they are used. Example: I, me, mine.
A traitor, male, is a proditor, female - proditrix meaning someone who gives over (to the enemy)
High treason is somewhat ideomatic (unique) in English, Latin words for treason are very context dependent. One is tradition, meaning handing over information (to the enemy). Also Maiestas, (from which majesty comes - change the i to a j) meaning both dignity and treason - go figure!.
Praise the emperor - that is easy a stock phrase in Latin: Ave Caesar
Cheers - if a wild crowd cheering, then there is no clear word, like a modern sports crowd whopping it up. The formal words are Ave (hail, greetings) and Vale (be well, greetings). If you mean a toast before drinking, Gaudete (be joyful) works well
Thank you... :)
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Sorry, I was away for this, but I've chatted with Baracus in PM.

For me, learning Latin was the best thing I did at school, it was excellent mental training, it gave - and still gives - me an understanding of the cultural roots of European civilisation for 2000 years, an important part of all 'the best that has been thought and known in the world'. it is a beautiful language with a magnificent literature (again, over 2000 years, it didn't begin or end with the Roman Empire by any means), and it has enabled me to get to grips with a good many languages - obviously Italian and Spanish, a lot of French, but it's also led me on to many others in the Indo-European family - and it (along with Greek) enables me to understand a great deal of scientific terminology, as well as the English of writers who themselves were brought up on Latin - i.e. most of them up to the early 20th century.

And if you're wanting a titulus, pop me a PM ;)
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
I am proud to say that I achieved the grand total of - One percent, in my Latin "O-level".
WTF is the point of learning a Dead language I ask? Can I go into a public house and order "Two pints of bitter and a bag of plain nuts" in Latin?

Duo sextarii cerevisiae amarae et succulum nucum simplicium, meus bonus!

I added, "My good man" at the end since I assumed you would be polite to the bartender at the new CF Latin Bar, where Latin is required and trouble makers aren't given the "bum's rush", but a trip to the cross
 

Frank Petrexa

Governor
Sorry, I was away for this, but I've chatted with Baracus in PM.

For me, learning Latin was the best thing I did at school, it was excellent mental training, it gave - and still gives - me an understanding of the cultural roots of European civilisation for 2000 years, an important part of all 'the best that has been thought and known in the world'. it is a beautiful language with a magnificent literature (again, over 2000 years, it didn't begin or end with the Roman Empire by any means), and it has enabled me to get to grips with a good many languages - obviously Italian and Spanish, a lot of French, but it's also led me on to many others in the Indo-European family - and it (along with Greek) enables me to understand a great deal of scientific terminology, as well as the English of writers who themselves were brought up on Latin - i.e. most of them up to the early 20th century.

And if you're wanting a titulus, pop me a PM ;)
A friend of mine is (or was) pretty good at French. He got me a copy of "Pythons on Pythons" (Monty Python members basically dissing each other) in Russian (which I can barely read anymore because the vocabulary is gone). He thought the title had two separate words, because he was completely unfamiliar with cases. It kind of shocked me. Anyway, once can ask whether there was "standard" Latin (nothing like Oxford English Dictionary) or whether we are stuck with haughty ancient sophisticates who could read and write just making a lot up as they went along. With all the subjunctive rules (in ancient Greek as well, which lacks punctuation and therefore requires all kinds of weird connector words) and such, one wonders whether people actually talked like that. The grammar is clearly a compendium of what ancient authors used--you don't know whether it's standard or whether some clown was in a completely separate tree. Also, the literature spans many centuries, and things change in that time (as English did).
To understand sciences like biology you need a lot of knowledge of in-jokes (Gary Larson, the "Far Side" cartoonist now retired, has a "sucking louse" named after him with his name Latinized, and many genes are named after what the fruit flies look like) as well as Latin and Greek, and for physics and engineering you need mathematics. High mathematics is very abstract, and most scientists can't do it. I have a book on the interface between mathematics and mathematical physics, which makes the claim it is a bridge between the mathematics mathematicians do and the mathematics mathematical physicists do, which are to an extent mutually unintelligible. I recall a math professor saying "you don't know what it is"--meaning it's mathematically unsupported--when physicists do integrals. In other words, "nobody talks like that", like what the mathematician does. In the preface to his books on quantum field theory, Steve Weinberg of noble prize fame claims the mathematics in it is "deplorable".
 
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