• Sign up or login, and you'll have full access to opportunities of forum.

Latin required....

Go to CruxDreams.com

Baracus

Rectidolor
Whoops I've mis-spelt the first part....
Oh well it'll have to suffice I'm afraid.... :( 20190422_083127.jpg
Okay another Query...please.
"Queen Whore" ??
(I've got a feeling what it might be....just need confirmation please....thanks )
 

Frank Petrexa

Governor
Whoops I've mis-spelt the first part....
Oh well it'll have to suffice I'm afraid.... :( View attachment 699253
Okay another Query...please.
"Queen Whore" ??
(I've got a feeling what it might be....just need confirmation please....thanks )

Well, this is tougher. Maybe Eulalia should handle it. Queen is regina. But do you mean queen and whore (regina et meretrix), queen of the whores (regina mertricum or regina scortorum), or royal whore--who could be a queen herself or just somebody to "service" the king (regina regia)
(aqua regia is a mineral acid which dissolves gold--"royal water"). On a cross they would probably just but regina/scortum.
We'll see what our expert says. One wouldn't want to use the wrong term and have everybody break out laughing, or worse insult someone important.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Full marks all round, I think.
Actually my first thought was to take the two nouns in apposition to each other
('queen-whore'), and use nominative for both - 'regina meretrix', 'regina scortor'.
And Baracus's 'regina puttana' isn't a bad shot - I think it would be fine in Italian,
and puttana, like French putain, must be from a Vulgar Latin *putana -
that word doesn't seem to be on the record, but Gregory of Tours in the 6th century
used puta as a synonym for meretrix, *putana would have been a diminutive of that, 'little whore'.
 

Baracus

Rectidolor
Full marks all round, I think.
Actually my first thought was to take the two nouns in apposition to each other
('queen-whore'), and use nominative for both - 'regina meretrix', 'regina scortor'.
And Baracus's 'regina puttana' isn't a bad shot - I think it would be fine in Italian,
and puttana, like French putain, must be from a Vulgar Latin *putana -
that word doesn't seem to be on the record, but Gregory of Tours in the 6th century
used puta as a synonym for meretrix, *putana would have been a diminutive of that, 'little whore'.
Thank you @Eulalia
With that in mind I'll use a wee bit of artistic licence (My Crucifix,my rules...Lol) & use the following Titulus....( on the reverse side)
"Regina Putana"....Thanks.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Full marks all round, I think.
Actually my first thought was to take the two nouns in apposition to each other
('queen-whore'), and use nominative for both
That was my stumbling block. I didn't offer a suggestion, because I couldn't quite envision the grammar of queen slut in Classical. I am not aware of Classical Latin using two nominatives in apposition (except sometimes as a restrictive appositive such as Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus. But isn't Magnus here an adjective, not a noun? ). I remembered that Greek used the genitive frequently in this place, but don't think Latin did.

But I am old and confused and defer to Eulalia Magna.
 

Baracus

Rectidolor
That was my stumbling block. I didn't offer a suggestion, because I couldn't quite envision the grammar of queen slut in Classical. I am not aware of Classical Latin using two nominatives in apposition (except sometimes as a restrictive appositive such as Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus. But isn't Magnus here an adjective, not a noun? ). I remembered that Greek used the genitive frequently in this place, but don't think Latin did.

But I am old and confused and defer to Eulalia Magna.
"Eulalia Magna"......I like that !! :) :)
 

Frank Petrexa

Governor
Full marks all round, I think.
Actually my first thought was to take the two nouns in apposition to each other
('queen-whore'), and use nominative for both - 'regina meretrix', 'regina scortor'.
And Baracus's 'regina puttana' isn't a bad shot - I think it would be fine in Italian,
and puttana, like French putain, must be from a Vulgar Latin *putana -
that word doesn't seem to be on the record, but Gregory of Tours in the 6th century
used puta as a synonym for meretrix, *putana would have been a diminutive of that, 'little whore'.

So Gregory of Tours was a bishop and a scholar (i.e., he had money)? I would assume, then, that he had a bit of first-hand experience with whores and would know the vocabulary. I thought about puta too, but couldn't find it in my dicitionaries (which are far from comprehensive and are probably prudish).
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
That was my stumbling block. I didn't offer a suggestion, because I couldn't quite envision the grammar of queen slut in Classical. I am not aware of Classical Latin using two nominatives in apposition (except sometimes as a restrictive appositive such as Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus. But isn't Magnus here an adjective, not a noun? ). I remembered that Greek used the genitive frequently in this place, but don't think Latin did.

But I am old and confused and defer to Eulalia Magna.
'urbs Roma', 'Philosophia, vitae magistra' (that one's from Cicero)
'When a Substantive or Pronoun is followed by another Substantive,
so that the second explains or describes the first,
and has the same relation to the rest of the sentence,
the second Noun agrees in Case with the first, and said to be in Apposition to it ...
A Noun in apposition agrees, if possible, in Number and Gender
with the Noun to which it is in apposition'
(saith Kennedy's Latin Primer)
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
So Gregory of Tours was a bishop and a scholar (i.e., he had money)? I would assume, then, that he had a bit of first-hand experience with whores and would know the vocabulary. I thought about puta too, but couldn't find it in my dicitionaries (which are far from comprehensive and are probably prudish).
I found it in Alexander Souter's Glossary of Later Latin - he just defines it as = meretrix,
so that shuts out anyone who doesn't know what that means ;)
 

Baracus

Rectidolor
Help required please,(again)
I'd like the Latin equivalent of the following statuses.....
"THIEF"
"RAPIST"
"DESERTER"
"MURDERER"

Can anyone help,translate,please??
Thanks
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Help required please,(again)
I'd like the Latin equivalent of the following statuses.....
"THIEF"
"RAPIST"
"DESERTER"
"MURDERER"

Can anyone help,translate,please??
Thanks
Bad timing with Eulalia away. I will try to help
Thief - several choices: fur (pl fures) thief bad guy, also cleptes snatcher cleptomaniac
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Rapist - stuprator, defiler, a common euphemism that was used in the Roman history to descried the rape of the daughters of Boudica. Also violator. Latin didn't really have a direct word for rape. The English word rape comes for Latin rapio, meaning to carry off. This was regarded as a form of marriage, not sexual violation. Use stuprator.

Deserter - a bunch of choices, mostly recognizable in english: desertor, defector, fugitvus. Best is transfuga (flee over [to the enemy])

Murderer - homicida (plain vanilla); parracida (with traitorous implications); sicarius (implies an assassin)
 

Baracus

Rectidolor
Rapist - stuprator, defiler, a common euphemism that was used in the Roman history to descried the rape of the daughters of Boudica. Also violator. Latin didn't really have a direct word for rape. The English word rape comes for Latin rapio, meaning to carry off. This was regarded as a form of marriage, not sexual violation. Use stuprator.

Deserter - a bunch of choices, mostly recognizable in english: desertor, defector, fugitvus. Best is transfuga (flee over [to the enemy])

Murderer - homicida (plain vanilla); parracida (with traitorous implications); sicarius (implies an assassin)
@Praefectus Praetorio thanks,for your input.I agree my timing was a bit skewed,seeing as our Slave Bard is otherwise occupied.... ;)
 
Top Bottom