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Baracus

Rectidolor
Okay Boys and Girls.....
I checked Google -Translate,and came up with the ones for REBEL(SLAVE) ENEMY OF ROME....
As a result I've made up some new signs for my Cross,with optional descriptions. Thanks for your input.
 

Frank Petrexa

Governor
Okay Boys and Girls.....
I checked Google -Translate,and came up with the ones for REBEL(SLAVE) ENEMY OF ROME....
As a result I've made up some new signs for my Cross,with optional descriptions. Thanks for your input.

You are right to prefer Eulalia over Google Translate.
A friend of mine (I do have one or two "amici") got an e-mail from a musician with the following signature: "suus 'non iens ut sugeret ipsum"
He could get suus and ipsum, but wondered if I could get more. The apostrophe really stumped me, the suus didn't fit, and the rest of it seemed to say "not going in order that he suck himself". So, I used Google translate. I know iens is the present participle of ire, to go, but that is never used for the "progressive" in English--"I'm going to study Latin", for example, or for an idiom like "it's going to rain". OK, so I put in "it's" and got "suus '"--it didn't know what to do with the contraction, so it just tacked on the apostrophe to a translation of the possessive "its". I figured out that "ut" might mean "to". I put in suck and got "sugeret", not the infinitive "sugere".
So the best I could figure out is that he wanted to say "it's not going to suck much" in Latin, put it in word for word, and got the above.
Grammar counts. Beyond sounding silly, you might start a fight (especially if you're doing a gig in a Roman bar).
 

Frank Petrexa

Governor
If I type "elementary, my dear watson" into Google translate, I get "coporibus simplicibus mi watson". That's an ablative plural? "Simple bodies"? I would be interested in what Eulalia thinks. Is it supposed to be some kind of ablative absolute? (Maybe Google isn't a dangerous monopolist after all, but more like the old "Mad" magazine.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Put it back in google and translate to English: "incarnated by simple Watson"
suus 'non iens ut sugeret ipsum translates to "it's not going to suck itself." That might be the intended meaning to say to your date?:rolleyes:

I sometimes use google translate for single words in another language. But I always translate back to get a better idea of what's happening.
 

Baracus

Rectidolor
Okay boys and Girls.....
I checked Google -Translate,and came up with the ones for REBEL(SLAVE) ENEMY OF ROME....
As a result I've made up some new signs for my Cross,with optional
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Mea maxima culpa, haec serva mala aberat :spank:

You are right to prefer Eulalia over Google Translate.
A friend of mine (I do have one or two "amici") got an e-mail from a musician with the following signature: "suus 'non iens ut sugeret ipsum"
He could get suus and ipsum, but wondered if I could get more. The apostrophe really stumped me, the suus didn't fit, and the rest of it seemed to say "not going in order that he suck himself". So, I used Google translate. I know iens is the present participle of ire, to go, but that is never used for the "progressive" in English--"I'm going to study Latin", for example, or for an idiom like "it's going to rain". OK, so I put in "it's" and got "suus '"--it didn't know what to do with the contraction, so it just tacked on the apostrophe to a translation of the possessive "its". I figured out that "ut" might mean "to". I put in suck and got "sugeret", not the infinitive "sugere".
So the best I could figure out is that he wanted to say "it's not going to suck much" in Latin, put it in word for word, and got the above.
Grammar counts. Beyond sounding silly, you might start a fight (especially if you're doing a gig in a Roman bar).

I think suus might be pig-Latin for sus, and the intended meaning might have been:
'a pig isn't going to suck himself' The apostrophe in 'iens is mysterious,
but I find mystery apostrophes do turn up when Google Translate is struggling.
If I'm anywhere near on the right lines, something like this would be better:
'sus seipsum sugere nolet'
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
If I type "elementary, my dear watson" into Google translate, I get "coporibus simplicibus mi watson". That's an ablative plural? "Simple bodies"? I would be interested in what Eulalia thinks. Is it supposed to be some kind of ablative absolute? (Maybe Google isn't a dangerous monopolist after all, but more like the old "Mad" magazine.
For 'elementary' I don't think it would actually be ablative absolute, rather ablative adverbial,
but it's the same thing however you parse it, 'facile'. So, 'Facile, filie Vati care meus.'
 

Frank Petrexa

Governor
Mea maxima culpa, haec serva mala aberat :spank:



I think suus might be pig-Latin for sus, and the intended meaning might have been:
'a pig isn't going to suck himself' The apostrophe in 'iens is mysterious,
but I find mystery apostrophes do turn up when Google Translate is struggling.
If I'm anywhere near on the right lines, something like this would be better:
'sus seipsum sugere nolet'

Type in "it's" in the English box in google translate, and the Latin comes out " suus ' ". My best guess is that it couldn't handle the contraction, converted it to the pedantic English possessive "its" (belonging to a thing) translated that to the reflexive "suus" (I don't know why it wouldn't use "suum"), and just tacked the apostrophe on the end.
There is still time for you to complain to the European Commission about this travesty (they are gunning for Google anyway) before Boris gets a chance to pull out of the EU. I could complain in the US, but to whom? FTC (they can't even stop robocalls)? Justice Department Antitrust Division? My Congressman (he'd never even see it, and his staff would just write a letter to someone who would respond politely and do nothing). Usually people just sue, but that costs money.
This is clearly malfeasance. I know what Julius Caesar would do, but that's frowned on these days.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Type in "it's" in the English box in google translate, and the Latin comes out " suus ' ". My best guess is that it couldn't handle the contraction, converted it to the pedantic English possessive "its" (belonging to a thing) translated that to the reflexive "suus" (I don't know why it wouldn't use "suum"), and just tacked the apostrophe on the end.
Could be, there's a website where people offer translations for garbled Latin like that,
and apparently it's been going the rounds, god knows why -
one contribution suggests 'it's going' for suus 'iens, which as you've explained is a howler,
another is 'it's not going to suck itself' - again, a kind of word for word substitution, 'suus ... ipsum' presumably for 'itself'?
But as you say, suus should be accusative, and anyway 'itself' would be seipsum, suum ipsum would be clumsy.
'It's not going to suck itself' should be, quite simply, 'seipsum non suget'.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Could be, there's a website where people offer translations for garbled Latin like that,
and apparently it's been going the rounds, god knows why -
one contribution suggests 'it's going' for suus 'iens, which as you've explained is a howler,
another is 'it's not going to suck itself' - again, a kind of word for word substitution, 'suus ... ipsum' presumably for 'itself'?
But as you say, suus should be accusative, and anyway 'itself' would be seipsum, suum ipsum would be clumsy.
'It's not going to suck itself' should be, quite simply, 'seipsum non suget'.
Thanks for the information Eul. It will come in handy on a first date with a Latin girl!:cool:

How about a translation for that proverbial ice-breaker, "Stick it up there and spread 'em."?
 
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