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Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Is not Bryn a hill (or possibly grudge)? I grew up a mile from Bryn Mawr College which name and the tow were to mean Great Hill as I was taught.
In keeping with the part Welsh Quaker heritage of Billy Penn's original colony (Bryn Mawr was founded by Quakers) and the surrounding area (the Philadelphia Main Line), the college named many of its earliest building after Welsh county towns, Brecon, Denbigh (1891), Merion (1885), Radnor (1887), and Pembroke East and West (1892.)
Radnor Hall, the College's third building and second dorm was designed by Walter Cope and John Stewardson. Radnor introduced to the United States the popular architectural style known as Collegiate Gothic. (Princeton, Washington University, Duke, and other schools modeled their architectural style on Bryn Mawr College's.)
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Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
In keeping with the part Welsh Quaker heritage of Billy Penn's original colony (Bryn Mawr was founded by Quakers) and the surrounding area (the Philadelphia Main Line), the college named many of its earliest building after Welsh county towns, Brecon, Denbigh (1891), Merion (1885), Radnor (1887), and Pembroke East and West (1892.)
Radnor Hall, the College's third building and second dorm was designed by Walter Cope and John Stewardson. Radnor introduced to the United States the popular architectural style known as Collegiate Gothic. (Princeton, Washington University, Duke, and other schools modeled their architectural style on Bryn Mawr College's.)
View attachment 953905
Other College buildings were named in the Welsh tradition. The first president's house, now the College's
business offices, is Cartref. A faculty residence is called Bettws Y Coed. The president's house is Pen Y Groes, which can, perhaps too aptly, be translated as "top of the cross." It was thought to mean, by a well-meaning amateur linguist, "in the grove." It is named for a village in Gwynedd, Wales, south of Caernarfon. 88% of the population are Welsh-speaking, making it one of the most predominantly Welsh-speaking areas of the country.
Brecon, a residential hall, was given a researched Welsh name. It is the name of the county in Wales where the town of Bryn Mawr can be found. .Helfarian, which can be loosely translated as "place where the gold is chased," is a combination of two Welsh words.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
In keeping with the part Welsh Quaker heritage of Billy Penn's original colony (Bryn Mawr was founded by Quakers) and the surrounding area (the Philadelphia Main Line), the college named many of its earliest building after Welsh county towns, Brecon, Denbigh (1891), Merion (1885), Radnor (1887), and Pembroke East and West (1892.)
Radnor Hall, the College's third building and second dorm was designed by Walter Cope and John Stewardson. Radnor introduced to the United States the popular architectural style known as Collegiate Gothic. (Princeton, Washington University, Duke, and other schools modeled their architectural style on Bryn Mawr College's.)
View attachment 953905
Do you know which Bryn Mawr in Wales it was named from? A quick check on the Welsh place-names database shows up at least 50! But what I find on the internet suggests the name (of the town and rail station) was given by some manager of the Philadelphia railroad as it sounded more upmarket than Humphreyville. Which isn't to say there weren't Welsh Quakers there in the days of Penn's 'Holy Experiment', there very probably were, the guy who gave the name might have been a Welshman, even a descendant of theirs, wanting to commemorate that bit of heritage?
 

Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
Do you know which Bryn Mawr in Wales it was named from? A quick check on the Welsh place-names database shows up at least 50! But what I find on the internet suggests the name (of the town and rail station) was given by some manager of the Philadelphia railroad as it sounded more upmarket than Humphreyville. Which isn't to say there weren't Welsh Quakers there in the days of Penn's 'Holy Experiment', there very probably were, the guy who gave the name might have been a Welshman, even a descendant of theirs, wanting to commemorate that bit of heritage?
According to Wiki;

Bryn Mawr is named after an estate near Dolgellau in Wales that belonged to Rowland Ellis. He was a Welsh Quaker who emigrated in 1686 to Pennsylvania from Dolgellau to escape religious persecution.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Do you know which Bryn Mawr in Wales it was named from?
Barb has answered.
Bryn Mawr is named after an estate near Dolgellau in Wales that belonged to Rowland Ellis. He was a Welsh Quaker who emigrated in 1686 to Pennsylvania from Dolgellau to escape religious persecution.
Dolgellau is in Gwynedd, in north-west Wales. Gwynedd is also a place name on the Main Line
the name (of the town and rail station) was given by some manager of the Philadelphia railroad as it sounded more upmarket than Humphreyville.
The name was chosen in 1869 by a railroad agent. But, he was an agent of the Pennsylvania Railroad. (A name of fame in corporate and railroad history. By 1882, the Pennsylvania Railroad had become the largest railroad (by traffic and revenue), the largest transportation enterprise, and the largest corporation in the world. Its budget was second only to the U.S. government. The corporation still holds the record for the longest continuous dividend history: it paid out annual dividends to shareholders for more than 100 consecutive years.)
Per bbc.com:
Pennsylvania in America, a lot of the leading Quaker members in Wales decided to emigrate. They'd had enough persecution and wanted to start a new life. So a lot of areas were bereft of their natural-born leaders, and the Quakers tended to die out in areas such as Dolgellau. Rowland Ellis of Brynmawr also moved to Philadelphia in 1687 and became a member of the government of the state. The prominent women's university, Brynmawr, is named after his home.
After moving to America, meeting houses were established at Merion, Radnor and Gwynedd, and these places remained Welsh until the middle of the 18th century. These buildings still stand today. (I attended Quaker meetings in all three of those buildings.)
 

Silent_Water

Governor
Barb has answered.

Dolgellau is in Gwynedd, in north-west Wales. Gwynedd is also a place name on the Main Line

Sorry for my curiosity, but "Dolgellau" sounds very "German" for me because of the ending "-au" or "-lau".

"Aue" or even "Au" is part of many German names for villages or cities, even in other countries like "Blumenau" (= "Flowers"-Aue) in Brazil etc. which were founded (by German-speaking immigrants) at brooks, creeks, rivers etc. and it means a "flat, wet region on the banks or shores of a rather small river".
In the German translation of "Lord of the Rings", "Das Auenland" is the translation for "The Shire", I think, so I would like to know how the name "Dolgellau" is derived etymological(-ly?).
Thank you very much!

Oh sorry! I think, I just found enough here but it is still interesting for me how similar old European names can be in Wales and Germany:
 
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old slave

FELIS RESPICIENS
Of course, @old slave does. He has a cameo appearance, being observant, at 13:11
How observant of you to spot my observations. Just checking whether it was time for tiffin, you know, that brunette always partakes, so when she leaves, that's my cue. Not that I'm stalking her, you understand, but one can't help noticing these things on a small ship. Maybe I'll bump into her in the Bamboo Lounge before dinner. Not that I'm stalking her, you understand.
 

trickydicky4u

Governor
How observant of you to spot my observations. Just checking whether it was time for tiffin, you know, that brunette always partakes, so when she leaves, that's my cue. Not that I'm stalking her, you understand, but one can't help noticing these things on a small ship. Maybe I'll bump into her in the Bamboo Lounge before dinner. Not that I'm stalking her, you understand.
Anytime is tiffin time...
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
According to Wiki;

Bryn Mawr is named after an estate near Dolgellau in Wales that belonged to Rowland Ellis. He was a Welsh Quaker who emigrated in 1686 to Pennsylvania from Dolgellau to escape religious persecution.
That make sense, I think Dolgellau was the strongest centre of the early Quakers in Wales.

I would like to know how the name "Dolgellau" is derived etymological(-ly?).
Dôl ‘a meadow in the bend of a river’, gellau is ‘(of) cells’, either monks’ cells or merchants’ booths. The –au ending (pronounced in north Wales to rhyme with ‘fly’, more of an ‘a’ or ‘e’sound in the south, but not like German ‘au’) is a common plural in Welsh, though plurals in the Celtic languages are dauntingly varied. And cellau becomes gellau after dôl as that word is feminine – another headache, the Celtic languages change the beginnings of words to mark gender, not the ends!


Historically, Dolgellau is in Meirionydd (Merioneth)
 

Loxuru

Graf von Kreuzigung
Yesterday, @MICHELE PATRI put a post on his martyrs in the arena thread about Sainte Béate, who got martyred in Gaul in 275 AD, in a place named Avrolles near Sens.

CF always instigating for expanding one's knowledge, my research made me discover Sainte Béate appearing on a stained window in the Sens cathedral, the second from right.

beate1.jpg

Now, could someone with a more profound theological background, explain me what is the meaning of the phallus-like attribute at Béate's feet?:confundio1:

beate2.jpg
 
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