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Thread for finding members with Languages other than English

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Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Okay, I'll start one called 'histoires et bavardage en français',
just you and me to begin with and we can identify and invite French speakers into it -
anyone want to join? quelqu'un veut rejoindre?
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Okay, I've set up a conversation. It's a bit late for me now,
I'll think tomorrow who we can invite, if you have suggestions please let me know
(you should be able to invite them into the conversation yourself, otherwise I shall)
 

Madiosi

Depictor of Dreams
Staff member
Hi folks, many members having only a few skills with the English language. I found this thread, for finding members with other languages.
Maybe can like the older members the newbies, how work the forum in the own language.
It exist a few Personal-Messages-Groups. I can invite new Members in the follow groups:
-Deutsch,
-Ελληνικά,
-Italiano,

Please dont forget, the best place for exchange of ideas is the public board!
 

fallenmystic

Governor
Aside from Korean, which is my native tongue, the only other language (aside from French which I learned at school but have almost forgotten) that I can speak is what I believe to be "English". And the level of resemblance to the actual language with the name seemes to vary according to the fluctuation of the blood concentration of caffeine during a day.

I have not really seen anyone on this site whose English was unintelligible (except for maybe Google Translate).
Hello there! I thought we knew each other, but apparently I was mistaken :p
 
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Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
In 1959, a mathematics professor from Harvard released a comedy-music album titled "An Evening Wasted with Tom Lehrer. I mention it for a song that was brought to mind by the discussion of how well (or not) English speakers speak English. I moved to the Southern US and occasionally run into someone like the Captain in this song. If you don't want to hear the whole thing, go to 4:30

Our captain has a handicap to cope with, sad to tell
He's from Georgia, and he doesn't speak the language very well
 

Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill

Meanwhile in English
Young children attend a Kindergarten (“children’s garden”). Gesundheit doesn’t really mean “bless you,” it means “health” — the good variety being implied. Psychiatrists speak of Angst (fear) and Gestalt (form) psychology, and when something is broken, it’s kaputt. Although not every English-speaker knows that Fahrvergnügen is “driving pleasure,” most do know that Volkswagen means “people’s car.” Musical works can have a Leitmotiv. Our cultural view of the world is called a Weltanschauung by historians or philosophers. Such terms are commonly understood by most well-read English-speakers, and all of them have been borrowed from German.
More English words borrowed from German:
(Notice how many have to do with food!) – blitz, blitzkrieg, cobalt, dachshund, delicatessen, ersatz, frankfurter, glockenspiel, hinterland, kaffeeklatsch, Munster and Limburger (cheeses named for German cities), pilsner (glass, beer), pretzel, quartz, rucksack, sauerkraut, schnaps, (apple) strudel, waltz, wiener. From Low German: brake, dote, tackle.
 

Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member

Meanwhile in English
Young children attend a Kindergarten (“children’s garden”). Gesundheit doesn’t really mean “bless you,” it means “health” — the good variety being implied. Psychiatrists speak of Angst (fear) and Gestalt (form) psychology, and when something is broken, it’s kaputt. Although not every English-speaker knows that Fahrvergnügen is “driving pleasure,” most do know that Volkswagen means “people’s car.” Musical works can have a Leitmotiv. Our cultural view of the world is called a Weltanschauung by historians or philosophers. Such terms are commonly understood by most well-read English-speakers, and all of them have been borrowed from German.
More English words borrowed from German:
(Notice how many have to do with food!) – blitz, blitzkrieg, cobalt, dachshund, delicatessen, ersatz, frankfurter, glockenspiel, hinterland, kaffeeklatsch, Munster and Limburger (cheeses named for German cities), pilsner (glass, beer), pretzel, quartz, rucksack, sauerkraut, schnaps, (apple) strudel, waltz, wiener. From Low German: brake, dote, tackle.

You missed “autobahn”.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Thats a very good idea!

Όποιος θέλει μπορεί να μου στείλει να τον προσθέσω στην ομαδική συνομιλία!
και οποια θέλει μπορεί να μου στείλει να την προσθέσω στην ομαδική συνομιλία! :)

blitz, blitzkrieg, cobalt, dachshund, delicatessen, ersatz, frankfurter, glockenspiel, hinterland, kaffeeklatsch, Munster and Limburger (cheeses named for German cities), pilsner (glass, beer), pretzel, quartz, rucksack, sauerkraut, schnaps, (apple) strudel, waltz, wiener. From Low German: brake, dote, tackle.
A few more - aurochs (at least palaeontologists and archaeologists write about them - but they usually think the singular is auroch, they can't get their heads round it being aurochs aurochsen like ox oxen), bismuth, fahrenheit, feldspar, fugelhorn, gneiss, greywacke, hamster, hock, lager, mangelwurzel, meerschaum (smoking pipe), plunder, poodle, shale, sleazy, swindler, zinc... (quite a lot more came from Old/ Middle High German via French)
Low German loans aren't easy to sort from Dutch, Frisian or unrecorded Old English (Anglo-Saxon) words - but askew, bout, cranberry, dowel, drill, dude, fib, frill, fuddle, grime, haze, hawker (pedlar), huckster, jerkin, kale, mate (noun), mink, minx, mug, pack, poll, prowl, punk, queer, rifle, shudder, slight, smug, smuggle, spray, trice, tub, tuck ... all probably from LG.
 
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