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Uplifting Thoughts for the Isolated and Depressed in Times of Plague

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Frank Petrexa

Governor
congratulations on looking at the map, Frank! :p

(and not at her puntas arenas)
Apparently some feel old age has advantages: one needn't worry about weather women in bikinis. I will give their opinions respect.

Plato in The Republic (in a conversation between Cephalus and Socrates):
Cephalus:
I remember hearing Sophocles the poet greeted by a fellow who asked: "How about your service of Aphrodite, Sophocles--is your natural force still unabated?"
And he replied, "Hush, man, most gladly have I escaped this thing you talk of, as if I had run away from a raging and savage beast of a master."

Jane Fonda (of all people):
"I'm not dating anymore, but I did up until a couple of years ago. I’m 80. I’ve closed up shop down there.”

So some can enjoy the other scenery around Punta Arenas and watch the penguins, without having to be manipulated by the weather kitten.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
The beauty of Irish music and the bravery of its sons are uplifting to recall
The Irish Brigade consisted predominantly of Irish Americans in the Union Army in the American Civil War. The designation of the first regiment in the brigade, the 69th New York Infantry, or the "Fighting 69th", continued in later wars. They were known by their famous war cry, "Faugh a Ballaugh", which is an anglicization of the Irish phrase, fág an bealach, meaning "clear the way". Only the 1st Vermont Brigade and Iron Brigade were ranked with the Irish Brigade for bravery and endurance during America's Civil War:
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Thomas Tallis - If ye love me

One of my favourites, and one of the best recordings too. It's one of the first anthems in English, composed in the short reign of Edward VI when the English Reformation was only just starting. Tallis (who probably remained a Catholic) showed wonderful sensitivity and skill in setting words from Coverdale's Great Bible, the first 'authorised' English Bible.
 

fallenmystic

Governor
Some of the soothing, cheerful songs from my favourite actress from the classic film musical era, Judy Garland:

I won't mention the name of the film the clip is from as you don't have to watch the full film... believe me you don't want to watch it :)


And if you are British (the film was released in the midst of the WW2, so the song was to cheer up those who lived in Europe, especially in the U.K.):

 
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elephas

Tribune
One of my favourites, and one of the best recordings too. It's one of the first anthems in English, composed in the short reign of Edward VI when the English Reformation was only just starting. Tallis (who probably remained a Catholic) showed wonderful sensitivity and skill in setting words from Coverdale's Great Bible, the first 'authorised' English Bible.
Some musicologists, for example Mikhail Kazinik, believe that Tallis is a composer of the same level as Bach, Handel, Mozart.
 

Frank Petrexa

Governor
The beauty of Irish music and the bravery of its sons are uplifting to recall
The Irish Brigade consisted predominantly of Irish Americans in the Union Army in the American Civil War. The designation of the first regiment in the brigade, the 69th New York Infantry, or the "Fighting 69th", continued in later wars. They were known by their famous war cry, "Faugh a Ballaugh", which is an anglicization of the Irish phrase, fág an bealach, meaning "clear the way". Only the 1st Vermont Brigade and Iron Brigade were ranked with the Irish Brigade for bravery and endurance during America's Civil War:
McClellan would be pleased to be mentioned, even though he was something of an egotist (and lost his nerve more than once). Grant won the war, but Shelby Foote did say that everything the Army of the Potomac did was the result of the training McClellan gave it. It's too bad he didn't use it very well.

The Iron Brigade ("those damned black hat fellers" as the rebels called them) consisted of the 5th and 6th Wisconsin, and the 19th Indiana.

You do not mention the 20th Maine.

There is a 1940 movie starring James Cagney Pat O'Brien about the 69th New York--The Fighting 69th.

There was an Irish Catholic Brigade (the San Patricios) which fought for Mexico against the United States (which was the aggressor, certainly) in the Mexican War (which Grant supposedly called a "wicked war").

 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
You do not mention the 20th Maine.
They were not a Brigade. The three I mentioned were not only renowned for much bravery, but suffered the highest casualties of any Brigades on the AOP.

If you want to recognize a regiment for gallantry, you could do far worse than The 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry who performed one of the most critical actions of the battle of Gettysburg during Longstreet’s Assault of July 2nd. Two Brigades of Longstreet’s men were advancing to penetrate the center of the Union line, which had been dangerously thinned to prop up other sectors. General Hancock rode up to the 1st Minnesota, the only organized Union troops at hand, pointed at the advancing Confederates, and ordered them to “Take those colors!” Their sacrificial charge against overwhelming odds halted the Confederate advance. It bought desperately needed time for the center of the Union line to reform.
265 men made the bayonet charge against approximately 1,000 confederates. The action lasted just over five minutes, but they halted the Rebel advance. The 82% casualty rate stands as the largest loss by any surviving U.S military unit in a single day's engagement ever (and in less than ten minutes of fighting). The surviving 47 rallied around Hancock under the ranking remaining officer, a Captain.
Five men carrying the unit's colors fell in the charge. The unit's colors are displayed in the rotunda of the Minnesota Capitol for public appreciation.
MN-4c-453-081.jpg0324a082ad1466f54f82b080889ec753.jpgdownload.jpg

Minnesota Forward!
A104.1.jpg
 
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Frank Petrexa

Governor
They were not a Brigade. The three I mentioned were not only renowned for much bravery, but suffered the highest casualties of any Brigades on the AOP.

If you want to recognize a regiment for gallantry, you could do far worse than The 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry who performed one of the most critical actions of the battle of Gettysburg during Longstreet’s Assault of July 2nd. Two Brigades of Longstreet’s men were advancing to penetrate the center of the Union line, which had been dangerously thinned to prop up other sectors. General Hancock rode up to the 1st Minnesota, the only organized Union troops at hand, pointed at the advancing Confederates, and ordered them to “Take those colors!” Their sacrificial charge against overwhelming odds halted the Confederate advance. It bought desperately needed time for the center of the Union line to reform.
265 men made the bayonet charge against approximately 1,000 confederates. The action lasted just over five minutes, but they halted the Rebel advance. The 82% casualty rate stands as the largest loss by any surviving U.S military unit in a single day's engagement ever (and in less than ten minutes of fighting). The surviving 47 rallied around Hancock under the ranking remaining officer, a Captain.
Five men carrying the unit's colors fell in the charge. The unit's colors are displayed in the rotunda of the Minnesota Capitol for public appreciation.
View attachment 897876View attachment 897877View attachment 897878

Minnesota Forward!
View attachment 897880
And the 20th Maine held "Little Round Top" (rebel canon there would have devastated the federal line) against an assault of similar size. Chamberlain was almost out of ammunition and ready to order a bayonet charge when the "lost platoon" appeared on the rebel flank and stopped the assault with withering fire.
One cannot say, despite its poor record under McClellan (Meade was in command at Gettysburg) that the Army of the Potomac lacked courage.
The Iron Brigade itself, on the first day at Gettysburg (three days of hell) held off Ewell's assault and gave Meade's command time to form its line on favorable terrain.
Neither army planned to fight at Gettysburg.
Soldiers matter, as does leadership. Numbers not so much.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
held off Ewell's assault
A. P Hill's assault. Euell Corp fought mostly against the XIth Corp of mostly German-Americans (over 200,000 German-born immigrants served in the United States Army during the Civil War). Many of these soldiers could speak little English beyond "I'm going to fight mit Sigel" (Major General Franz Sigel) which was their proud slogan and which became one of the favorite songs of the war.
I goes mit regimentals;
To schlauch dem voes of Liberty
Like dem old Continentals;
Vot fights mit England long ago
To save de Yankee Eagle,
Un now I gets mine sojer clothes,
I’m going to fight mit Sigel.

Ven I comes from de Deutsche Countree,
I vorks some dimes at baking,
Den I keeps a lager bier saloon,
Un den I goes shoe-making;
But now I was a sojer been
To save de Yankee Eagle;
To schlauch dem tam Secession volks,
I’m going to fight mit Sigel.

I gets ein tam big rifle guns,
Un puts him to mine shoulder,
Den march so bold. like big jack horse,
Un may been someding bolder;
I goes off mit de volunteers,
To save de Yankee Eagle,
To give dem rebel vellers fits,
I’m going to fight mit Sigel.

Dem Deutshen mens, mit Sigel’s band,
At fighting have no rival,
Un ven Cheff Davis’ mens we meet,
Ve schlauch’ em like de tuyvil;
Dere’s only von ting vot I fear,
Ven pattling for de Eagle,
I vont get not no lager bier,
Ven I goes to fight mit Sigel.

For rations, dey gives salty pork,
I dinks dat was a great sell,
I petter likes de sour krout,
De switzer kaise un pretzel.
If Fighting Joe (or Liddle Mac) will give us dem,
Ve’ll save de Yankee Eagle:
Un I’ll put mine vrou in breechaloons.
To go un fight mit Sigel.
 

Silent_Water

Governor
I think I understand the most sentences here but some words confuse me because they exist in German in exactly the same version and probably in another meaning, e.g. "Schlauch" is a tube or a hosepipe, but you can also use the word as a verb saying something different like "Das schlaucht ganz schön." = "This is pretty exhausting (or making tired)."

But here it could also be a similar sounding word for "Schlacht" (battle) or "schlachten" (= slaughtering, butchering?) or something completely different?
 
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