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Bdsm scenes in novels that do not deal with the subject.

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montycrusto

Slave Trader
Could you be a little more specific? By "a little mistreated" do you mean that they refer to her as "Miss Cristina" rather than "Ms Cristina," and expect her to make the coffee and wash the dishes, or do you mean rape and floggings? In other words, is it worth checking out for the hot parts?
I was hoping we were going to get juicy extracts from these works.. but apparently no..:( just a bit of a tease.;)
 

Loxuru

Graf von Kreuzigung
Also, *Cough* Harry Potter *Cough*
Right! Just watch Spielberg's movie 'Young Sherlock Holmes' (1986), and next the first Harry Potter movie. Same setting (same boarding school), same characters (Potter = Holmes, Ron Weasley = Watson), same arrogant bullying guy, ,same girl in peril, same secret ceremonies, same bad guy, an 'Egyptian' teacher in both stories).
 

Jon Smithie

Governor
D H Lawrence liked to portray independent-minded women who stayed downtrodden,
he had a cruel fate in store for any who rode away!

View attachment 861477
That D. H. Lawrence?! I'm gonna have to check this story out! Actually, I just now stepped out and skimmed a critical evaluation of the story and much to my surprise, the cover art apparently does represent the climactic action of the story. A white woman is sacrificed as part of an American Indian ritual. I've only read one of D. H. Lawrence's works; "Ulysses," and had no inkling that ole D. H. had CF type interests!

“ T H E W O M A N W H O R O D E A W A Y ” : D. H. L A W R E N C E ’ S C U L - D E - S A C LAURENCE STEVEN Laurentian University-

The Woman Who Rode Away” has divided its critics into two distinct camps. There are, on the one hand, those critics who read the story in Lawrence’s terms, as a fable symbolizing the annihilation of the egodominated or “white” consciousness of Western civilization through the sacrifice of its representative, the modern American woman, on the altar of the blood conscious primitive tribe. . . On the other hand, R. P. Draper, Kate Millett, and David Cavitch are appalled by what they see as the exploitation and murder of the woman. For them, Lawrence’s “fable” is a smokescreen which allows him to vent his hatred of women. . . "


While I haven't read the story yet, or read much of Lawrence at all, and while I am sure that Lawrence wrote at levels of depth of meaning that I will never be able to plumb, and I have no idea of any personal peccadillos he might have had, or what his true feelings concerning women were, I kinda like the old saying "Of two possibilities, always pick the third." I prefer to entertain the possibility that maybe he just enjoyed a fantasy about a woman being bound and tortured.
 

windar

Teller of Tales
I've only read one of D. H. Lawrence's works; "Ulysses," and had no inkling that ole D. H. had CF type interests!
Wasn't that by James Joyce??? :confused:

“ T H E W O M A N W H O R O D E A W A Y ” : D. H. L A W R E N C E ’ S C U L - D E - S A C LAURENCE STEVEN Laurentian University-

The Woman Who Rode Away” has divided its critics into two distinct camps. There are, on the one hand, those critics who read the story in Lawrence’s terms, as a fable symbolizing the annihilation of the egodominated or “white” consciousness of Western civilization through the sacrifice of its representative, the modern American woman, on the altar of the blood conscious primitive tribe. . . On the other hand, R. P. Draper, Kate Millett, and David Cavitch are appalled by what they see as the exploitation and murder of the woman. For them, Lawrence’s “fable” is a smokescreen which allows him to vent his hatred of women. . . "
On the other hand, the critics are unanimous on my stories. "Crap!", "Dreck!" "Garbage!" The way he exploits that Barbara Moore. All that stuff with the dinners in New York restaurants and the crime solving was just a smokescreen to portray her suffering...
 

Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member
Wasn't that by James Joyce??? :confused:


On the other hand, the critics are unanimous on my stories. "Crap!", "Dreck!" "Garbage!" The way he exploits that Barbara Moore. All that stuff with the dinners in New York restaurants and the crime solving was just a smokescreen to portray her suffering...
What? You’re telling me those stories aren’t literary masterpieces??? :confused:
 

josé miguel tecles verdú

Assistant executioner
In response to montycrusto:

I think you're right. Possibly one day I would put snippets of such described scenes, but it is obvious that I will not always be willing to do so, since I will not always have time to write such scenes here. I will soon do so in one of the novels I mentioned.
 

Jon Smithie

Governor
OMG! I'm so embarrassed! :facepalm: You know how some people will turn away in polite embarrassment and never mention it when you're fly's unzipped or you have a booger on your face? Thank you, Windar, for not turning away. Yes, of course, James Joyce wrote "Ulysses." I haven't read anything by D. H. Lawrence. I did download "The Woman Who Rode Away" and am reading it, and that, I'm pretty sure, at least I have it on good authority, is by D. H. Lawrence. So. . . there's that . . .
 
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