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Julie's Roman Theatre

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admihoek

Administrator
Staff member
Heaven don't want (burp) us an' da devil is scraced we'll take over...

No, I think Admi has 'em on order in another thread, but thank you...

THT
take another one Tree, you need it bad................... yes me too Ulrike We have a wedding to celebrate............
 

admihoek

Administrator
Staff member
Is there no bourbon at this reception? Oh well a good Dutch beer will be fine.
Cheers to the happy couple
you would beer thus you get beer:D
 

melissa

Administrator
Staff member
Hello boys!... Now what would you like to drink?

Dolores1.jpg
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
aha that's why it was calm in our coffeeshop: new waitresses, new paint, new design marvelous Eul would be stunned when she comes back from her ordeal on the cross.:D
and give me one in a boot.
New nail-varnish too?​
:p
 

admihoek

Administrator
Staff member
yes now is it a cosy coffeshop too:D
 

admihoek

Administrator
Staff member
Tree is on his way to the shop I'm sure he wants a coffee fresh grinded by one of the lovely slavegirls.
Oh and the send-it downloadlink of part 7 of spartacus is today posted in julies nightcinema (529MB):D
 

admihoek

Administrator
Staff member
I got permission from Vlad for a dialy summary of historic happenings I started today with the first one in this thread the 13th March.

A new planet was discovered on March 13 and Phoenix, Arizona, was visited by a fleet of UFOs. This is also the anniverary of two historic sieges that ended badly for the defenders, as well as a notorious murder case in which bystanders did nothing because they"didn't want to get involved."

483. St. Felix is elected Pope, choosing the name Felix III. He was born into a Roman senatorial family and said to have been an ancestor of Saint Gregory the Great. Nothing certain is known of Felix until he succeeded St. Simplicius and started throwing "heretics" out of the Church.

His first act was to repudiate a deed of union, supposedly originating with patriarch Acacius of Constantinople and published by the emperor Zeno with the view of allaying the strife in the Eastern Rite Church. In his first synod Felix excommunicated Peter the Fuller, who had assumed the See of Antioch against Papal wishes. In 484, Felix also excommunicated Peter Mongus, who had taken the See of Alexandria - an act which brought about a schism between East and West that was not healed until 519.

So after a reign in which excommunication and schism were featured, how did he get to become a saint? It is said that Felix appeared to one of his descendants, Trasilla (an aunt of St. Gregory the Great), bidding her to enter her abode of glory. On the eve of Christmas Trasilla died, seeing Jesus beckoning.


1138. Cardinal Gregorio Conti is elected Antipope as Victor IV, succeeding Anacletus II.
1639. Harvard College is named for clergyman John Harvard. In 1636 the New College came into existence by vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony -- though without a single building, instructor, or student. In 1639 it was re-named in honor of deceased Charlestown minister John Harvard, who had bequeathed to the school his entire library and half of his monetary estate. Harvard's first instructor, schoolmaster Nathaniel Eaton, was also its first instructor to be dismissed -- in 1639 for overstrict discipline. The school's first students were graduated in 1642.

1781. William Herschel discovers the planet Uranus. Herschel was a German-born British astronomer, technical expert, and composer. Born in Hanover, Germany Wilhelm first followed his father into the Military Band of Hanover, but emigrated to Britain at age 19. Herschel became most famous for the discovery of Uranus in addition to two of its major moons, Titania and Oberon. He also discovered two moons of Saturn and infrared radiation. Herschel is also known for the twenty-four symphonies that he composed.

1846. The Ballinglass Incident takes place during the Irish Potato Famine -- 300 tenants at the village of Ballinglass in Ireland are evicted from their homes to make room for livestock.

Most of the land in Ireland belonged to English landlords. The Irish farmers were tenants, producing cereals, potatoes and livestock. But only the potatoes remained as food for the farmers themselves; the other products were used for paying the rent and exported from Ireland to England. These exports continued when the potato crop failed in 1845. Farmers who weren't able to pay the rent in this situation were evicted from their homes and land. It is estimated that tens of thousands were evicted during the famine.

The 300 inhabitants of the village of Ballinglass in Galway County were relatively "wealthy" and able to pay their rent. But despite this, they were evicted on March 13, 1846 because the landlord, a woman whose name was Mrs. Gerrard, intended to establish a grazing farm where the village was situated. The houses of Ballinglass were demolished by army and police; the people slept in the ruins in the following night. The next day, police and army returned to evict them definitely. Their neighbors were not allowed to take them in.

1862. During the American Civil War, the U.S. federal government forbids all Union army officers from returning fugitive slaves, thus effectively annulling the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 and setting the stage for the Emancipation Proclamation.

1865.In a desperate measure, the Confederate States of America reluctantly approve the use of black troops as the main Rebel armies face long odds against much larger Union armies at this late stage of the war. The measure did nothing to stop the destruction of the Confederacy. Several thousand blacks were enlisted in the Rebel cause, but they could not begin to balance out the nearly 200,000 blacks that fought for the Union.

1881, Czar Alexander II, the ruler of Russia since 1855, is killed in the streets of St. Petersburg by a bomb thrown by a member of the revolutionary "People's Will" group.

1884. The Siege of Khartoum begins in Sudan. It would end with a massacre on January 26, 1885. Troops loyal to the Mahdi Muhammad Ahmad laid siege to Khartoum against the defenders led by British General Charles George Gordon, resulting in the massacre of the Anglo-Egyptian garrison. Gordon, a colorful character, was killed in battle when the city fell.

1900. France passes a law limiting the length of a workday for women and children to 11 hours.

1901. Benjamin Harrison, the 23rd president of the United States, dies in Indianaoplis at age 67.​
1915. British forces end their three-day assault on the German trenches near the village of Neuve Chapelle in northern France, the first offensive launched by the British in the spring of 1915.

The Battle of Neuve Chapelle began on March 10, 1915, at 8:05 a.m., when British forces attempted to break through the German trenches at Neuve Chapelle and capture the village of Aubers, less than a mile to the east. In the opening assault, 342 guns barraged the trenches for 35 minutes, partially directed by 85 reconnaissance aircraft flying overhead. The total number of shells fired during this barrage exceeded the number fired in the whole of the Boer War (a conflict fought in South Africa between British forces and South African revolutionaries in 1899-1902) -- a frightening testament to how much the nature of war had changed in less than 15 years.
1921. Mongolia, under the "Bloody Baron," declares its independence from China. Baron Roman Friederich Nickolaus von Ungern-Sternberg, also known as the Bloody Baron was a Baltic German-Russian lieutenant-general, one of the military commanders on the side of the White movement during the Russian Civil War, later an independent warlord in pursuit of pan-monarchist goals in Mongolia and territories east of Lake Baikal.

After the Bolshevik-led October Revolution of 1917,Ungern von Sternberg joined the fight against them. In the following months Ungern von Sternberg distinguished himself by extreme cruelty to the local population and to his own subordinates. He earned the nickname Bloody Baron. Ungern von Sternberg was also known as the "Mad Baron" because of his exceedingly eccentric behavior.

Since 1919, Mongolia was occupied by Chinese republican forces. In late 1920-early 1921 Ungern von Sternberg's troops entered Mongolia at the invitation of the displaced Bogd Khan, Mongolia's civil and religious ruler.

On March 13, 1921, Mongolia was proclaimed an independent monarchy, and Ungern von Sternberg became Mongolian dictator. A mystic who was fascinated by beliefs and religions of the Far East such as Buddhism and who believed himself to be a reincarnation of Genghis Khan, Ungern von Sternberg's philosophy was a muddled mixture of Russian nationalism with Chinese and Mongol beliefs. In real life, his brief rule of Mongolia was characterized by looting and a reign of terror by his army.

A Red Army force defeated Ungern von Sternberg's forces in Mongolia. In May, he was captured by his own soldiers, and handed over to the Red Army on August 21, 1921. After a quick military tribunal, Ungern von Sternberg was executed by a firing squad. Before his execution, Ungern von Sternberg was said to have chewed up his Cross of St. George medal in order to prevent it from falling into the hands of the sacrilegious communists.

1933. Banks in the United States begin to re-open after the Presidentially mandated "bank holiday" during the Great Depression.

1938. World News Roundup is broadcast for the first time on CBS Radio in the United States.It first went on-air on as a one-time special in response to growing tensions in Europe -- specifically the Anschluss, during which Adolf Hitler annexed Austria. The program was a 35-minute special report from multiple locations around the world as the pre-war crisis mounted. It was the first time that on-the-scene European field correspondents were linked with a central anchor in New York for a national broadcast. The format was so successful that it was repeated the following evening, and then revived later that year during the Sudetenland crisis. Eventually, it evolved into a daily show. The CBS World News Roundup remains an active part of the CBS Radio Network lineup, making it America's longest running network newscast on radio or TV.

1940. The Russo-Finnish Winter War ends.

1942. The Quartermaster Corps (QMC) of the United States Army begins training dogs for the newly established War Dog Program, or "K-9 Corps." The K-9 Corps initially accepted over 30 breeds of dogs, but the list was soon narrowed to seven: German Shepherds, Belgian sheep dogs, Doberman Pinschers, collies, Siberian Huskies, Malumutes and Eskimo dogs. Members of the K-9 Corps were trained for a total of 8 to 12 weeks. After basic obedience training, they were sent through one of four specialized programs to prepare them for work as sentry dogs, scout or patrol dogs, messenger dogs or mine-detection dogs. In active combat duty, scout dogs proved especially essential by alerting patrols to the approach of the enemy and preventing surprise attacks.
1944. Britain announces that all travel between Ireland and the United Kingdom is suspended, the result of the Irish government's refusal to expel Axis-power diplomats within its borders.

1954. The Battle of Dien Bien Phu begins as Viet Minh forces attack the French. The Battle of Dien Bien Phu was the last major battle in the First Indochina War between the military forces of France and Vietnamese revolutionary forces called the Viet Minh. The battle occurred between March and May 1954, and culminated in a massive French defeat that effectively ended the war.

1956. American actress Dana Delany is born in New York City. She grew up in Connecticut. She has performed on stage and in film but is known mainly for her two-time Emmy Award winning performance as Colleen McMurphy on the ABC television show China Beach (1988-1991). Delany has been active in film, television, and stage since the late 1970s. (See pictures.)

1957. Cuban student revolutionaries storm the presidential palace in Havana in a failed attempt on the life of PresidentFulgencio Batista.

1964. Kitty Genovese is murdered in New York. The case created a national sensation because her assault and murder was witnessed by dozens of neighbors who did nothing to intervene.

Genovese had driven home in the early morning of March 13, 1964. Arriving home at about 3:15 a.m. and parking about 100 feet (30 m) from her apartment's door, she was approached by Winston Moseley. Moseley ran after her and quickly overtook her, stabbing her twice in the back. When Genovese screamed out, her cries were heard by several neighbors; but on a cold night with the windows closed, only a few of them recognized the sound as a cry for help. When one of the neighbors shouted at the attacker, "Let that girl alone!", Moseley ran away and Genovese slowly made her way towards her own apartment around the end of the building. She was seriously injured, but now out of view of those few who may have had reason to believe she was in need of help.

Other witnesses observed Moseley enter his car and drive away, only to return ten minutes later. He systematically searched the parking lot, train station, and small apartment complex, ultimately finding Genovese, who was lying, barely conscious, in a hallway at the back of the building. Out of view of the street and of those who may have heard or seen any sign of the original attack, he proceeded to further attack her, stabbing her several more times. While she lay dying, he sexually assaulted her. He stole about $49 from her and left her dying in the hallway. The attacks spanned approximately half an hour.

The circumstances of her murder and the apparent reaction (or lack thereof) of her neighbors were reported by a newspaper article published two weeks later and prompted investigation into the psychological phenomenon that became known as the bystander effect, the "Bad Samaritan Complex" or "Genovese syndrome."

1979. The New Jewel Movement, headed by Maurice Bishop, ousts Prime MinisterEric Gairy in a nearly bloodless coup d'etat in Grenada.

1986. Microsoft has its Initial public offering.

1988. The Seikan Tunnel, the longest undersea tunnel in the world, opens between Aomori and Hakodate, J apan.
1992. A 6.8-magnitude earthquake near Erzincan, Turkey, and an unusually powerful aftershock two days later kill at least 500 people and leave 50,000 people homeless.

1996. A gunman opens fire on a class of kindergarteners at an elementary school in Dunblane, Scotland, killing 16 children and one teacher before killing himself.​

1997. In Phoenix, Arizona, the "Phoenix Lights," one of the most widely witnessed UFO sightings, take place. Lights of varying descriptions were seen by thousands of people between 19:30 and 22:30 MST, in a space of about 300 miles, from the Nevada line, through Phoenix, to the edge of Tucson. UFO proponents claimed they were part of aircraft unknown to man, but the USAF identified them as flares dropped by A-10 Warthog aircraft which were on training exercises.

2003. The journal Nature reports that 350,000-year-old upright-walking human footprints have been found in Italy.

2008, Gold prices on the New York Mercantile Exchange hit $1,000 per ounce for the first time.

2011. The Japan Meteorological Agency upgrades the magnitude of the Sendai earthquake to 9.0. The death toll is expected to exceed 10,000. Meanwhile, the Shinmoedakevolcano in Kag oshima Prefecture, Japan explodes aga in.

Elsewhere, a wind and rainstorm in the Pacific Northwest of the United States results in the loss of power to 114,000 in Portland, Oregon.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Dunblane 1996 still brings tears to my eyes.​
I know the town, even the school, well.​
I can supply Virgin Martyrs for a good many days of the year.​
March 13th is St Christina of Persia, a maiden who was scourged to death under Chosroes I, 531-79.​
 

admihoek

Administrator
Staff member
Dunblane 1996 still brings tears to my eyes.​
I know the town, even the school, well.​
I can supply Virgin Martyrs for a good many days of the year.​
March 13th is St Christina of Persia, a maiden who was scourged to death under Chosroes I, 531-79.​
also the idea for a daily summary will be estimated?
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
also the idea for a daily summary will be estimated?
Perhaps "selected highlights"?​
There's certainly plenty to think about in one day's record, mostly grim.​
 

admihoek

Administrator
Staff member
Splendid, girl, but are my highlights yours I'll give it a try and looking for the European and Roman one's in it:cool: and the thread? in this one?
 

melissa

Administrator
Staff member
Dunblane 1996 still brings tears to my eyes.​
I know the town, even the school, well.​
I can supply Virgin Martyrs for a good many days of the year.​
March 13th is St Christina of Persia, a maiden who was scourged to death under Chosroes I, 531-79.​

We held a magnificent concert in aid of the Dunblane appeal.
 
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