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Barbaria1

Rebel Leader
Staff member

Rias

Neko Girl
oho new archeological evidences letters write on stone found in gladiators school in pompei city saying crucifixion was very popular sport in ancient rome like gladiators fights on arena not only punishment for murderers,bandits,pirates squirrels and not only sometimes for enterain fat lazy ugly squirrels senators and spectators on arena by executed squirrels bandits meow :oops::cat: :conejo::mouse:
 
A bit later than our normal Roman fair but an interesting tale about a possible English colony in the East Roman Empire (aka Byzantine Empire) post Norman conquest.

 

montycrusto

Slave Trader
A bit later than our normal Roman fair but an interesting tale about a possible English colony in the East Roman Empire (aka Byzantine Empire) post Norman conquest.

I’d doesn’t say where this “ New England” was exactly.. but it sounds like Crimea
 
I’d doesn’t say where this “ New England” was exactly.. but it sounds like Crimea
That is a common theory some folks pointing to the Londina River references in certain medieval charts


 

phlebas

PRIMUS POENUS
Staff member
A bit later than our normal Roman fair but an interesting tale about a possible English colony in the East Roman Empire (aka Byzantine Empire) post Norman conquest.


Anglo Saxon refugees were a well known element in Byzantium at the time, many finding service among the Varangians. A corner of the Balkans that was for a time English :) People in early medieval times got around much more than you might think.
 

poem21045

Tribune

mp5stab

Hair and Nails
oho new archeological evidences letters write on stone found in gladiators school in pompei city saying crucifixion was very popular sport in ancient rome like gladiators fights on arena not only punishment for murderers,bandits,pirates squirrels and not only sometimes for enterain fat lazy ugly squirrels senators and spectators on arena by executed squirrels bandits meow :oops::cat: :conejo::mouse:
Would anyone happen to have CBS All Access for some godforsaken reason? I'd like to see this program, but on my computer. I don't have cable.
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Also posted in Funny

Here's a real knee-slapper from ancient Rome:
Cuiusdam provincialis iocus asper innotuit. Intraverat Romam simillimus Caesari et in se omnium ora converterat. Augustus perduci ad se hominem iussit, visumque hoc modo interrogavit: Dic mihi, adolescens, fuit aliquando mater tua Romae? Negavit ille, nec contentus adiecit: Sed pater meus saepe.
- Macrobius, Saturnalia, 2.3

Anyone? @Eulalia ?
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
Also posted in Funny

Here's a real knee-slapper from ancient Rome:
Cuiusdam provincialis iocus asper innotuit. Intraverat Romam simillimus Caesari et in se omnium ora converterat. Augustus perduci ad se hominem iussit, visumque hoc modo interrogavit: Dic mihi, adolescens, fuit aliquando mater tua Romae? Negavit ille, nec contentus adiecit: Sed pater meus saepe.
- Macrobius, Saturnalia, 2.3

Anyone? @Eulalia ?
@Eulalia translated in Funny.

Caligula's sense of humor
Lautiore convivio effusus subito in cachinnos consulibus, qui iuxta cubabant, quidnam rideret blande quaerentibus: "quid," inquit, "nisi uno meo nutu iugulari utrumque vestrum statim posse?"
Suetonius, Caligula, 32
 
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Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
@Eulalia translated in Funny.

Caligula's sense of humor
Lautiore convivio effusus subito in cachinnos consulibus, qui iuxta cubabant, quidnam rideret blande quaerentibus: "quid," inquit, "nisi uno meo nutu iugulari utrumque vestrum statim posse?"
Suetonius, Caligula, 32
At one of his more sumptuous banquets he [Caligula] suddenly burst into a fit of laughter, and when the consuls, who were reclining next to him, politely inquired at what he was laughing, he replied; “What do you suppose, except that at a single nod of mine both of you could have your throats cut on the spot?”
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
@Eulalia translated in Funny.

Caligula's sense of humor
Lautiore convivio effusus subito in cachinnos consulibus, qui iuxta cubabant, quidnam rideret blande quaerentibus: "quid," inquit, "nisi uno meo nutu iugulari utrumque vestrum statim posse?"
Suetonius, Caligula, 32
At a banquet, he suddenly fell into a fit of giggling, for which the consuls reclining beside him politely asked the reason:
'Oh, nothing,' he said, 'just that I only need to give a nod, and you'll both have your throats cut!' :eek:

(oi, I thought i was supposed to be the translator :p )
 

Praefectus Praetorio

Brother of the Quill
At one of his more sumptuous banquets he [Caligula] suddenly burst into a fit of laughter, and when the consuls, who were reclining next to him, politely inquired at what he was laughing, he replied; “What do you suppose, except that at a single nod of mine both of you could have your throats cut on the spot?”
Here is a kind of joke that backfired on the teller. It is very difficult to translate. The humor is in a double meaning of some words.

Notati a censoribus, qui audientibus iis dixerant ioca quaedam intempestiviter; ac de eius quoque nota deliberatum, qui steterat forte apud eos oscitabundus.
Inter censorum severitates tria haec exempla in litteris sunt castigatissimae disciplinae. Unum est huiuscemodi: Censor agebat de uxoribus sollemne iusiurandum; verba erant ita concepta: "Ut tu ex animi tui sententia uxorem habes?" Qui iurabat, cavillator quidam et canicula et nimis ridicularius fuit. Is locum esse sibi ioci dicundi ratus, cum ita, uti mos erat, censor dixisset "ut tu ex animi tui sententia uxorem habes?", "habeo equidem," inquit, "uxorem, sed non hercle ex animi mei sententia." Tum censor eum, quod intempestive lascivisset, in aerarios rettulit causamque hanc ioci scurrilis apud se dicti subscripsit.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
Indeed, a toughie. I think the point is, the Censor is asking a man to swear, using the phrase that was used for formal oath-taking, 'ex animi tui sententia', literally, 'by the judgement of your spirit' - 'Do you, by the judgement of your spirit, have a wife?' to which the wag replies, 'Indeed I have a wife, but, by Hercules, not according to the judgement of my spirit' i.e. 'she's certainly not what I want'. The Censor was not amused.
 
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