• Sign up or login, and you'll have full access to opportunities of forum.

On The Recurrence Of Forced Sex Thematics In Roman Crucifixion Art And Literature

Go to CruxDreams.com

Apostate

Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Likes
47,477
Location
The Western Reserve
This isn’t exactly forced sex, but certainly qualifies as sexual assault under most US jurisdictions.

Ancient Rome, maybe not. :rolleyes:
 

Attachments

Apostate

Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Likes
47,477
Location
The Western Reserve
Ok, I found a rather extended "What really happened to Boudicca?" set.

These renders represent what was known in antiquity as the "itinerant temple priest" position, which is known in the modern era by a similar term.
 

Attachments

Apostate

Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Likes
47,477
Location
The Western Reserve
Here Agricola's men employ an ill considered method of breaking the Iceni Queen's spirit. This sequence lacks the final few panels, known collectively as "Boudicca's Revenge." :eek:
 

Attachments

Apostate

Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Likes
47,477
Location
The Western Reserve
Here we have nothing even close to forced sex; more like Boundheat's lesbian softcore. But it seems I’ve developed an unseemly fondness for Scarecrow's Barbies. :p
 

Attachments

melissa

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Likes
22,351
Location
Sheffield, UK
A full size pic courtesy of bdsmlr.....


Polly Perkins is our time travelling companion usually found rescuing damsels in distress or simply looking at lesser known parts of history. She travels in a Jiffy (Three times faster than a Trice) and uses green candle power. She sends her pics via her Raspberry linked to her LadyBird satellites throughout the known universe. Her last message says that it's about time we posted some more Roman decadence on this thread. It appears that on another galaxy there was a Roman called Commodus who was a rival of Maximus (The Gladiator on our planet) . Apparently Commodus and his Praetorian Guard attacked the villa of Maximus while he was away and rather upset everyone.
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2018
Likes
1,363
Location
new england
A full size pic courtesy of bdsmlr.....


Polly Perkins is our time travelling companion usually found rescuing damsels in distress or simply looking at lesser known parts of history. She travels in a Jiffy (Three times faster than a Trice) and uses green candle power. She sends her pics via her Raspberry linked to her LadyBird satellites throughout the known universe. Her last message says that it's about time we posted some more Roman decadence on this thread. It appears that on another galaxy there was a Roman called Commodus who was a rival of Maximus (The Gladiator on our planet) . Apparently Commodus and his Praetorian Guard attacked the villa of Maximus while he was away and rather upset everyone.
They don't look upset to me. I think they like it.
 

Apostate

Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Likes
47,477
Location
The Western Reserve
Two recent pics from Markus' Pleasure in Suffering.

I can’t decide if I prefer his recent photo manipulations or his drawings, and look forward to viewing lots more of his work before I make up my mind. ;):very_hot:
 

Attachments

xenophon

Spectator
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Likes
45
Promos for a Quoom series that's rather recent. Sort of a "beware Greeks bearing dicks" scenario. :rolleyes:
Just noticed this. The attriibution is not quite accurate. The pictures are from Quoom's "Last Queen of Troy -- Apollo's Daughter", pages ten to fifteen. This was posted in Sumner 2009 - not really recent. Quoom's current stuff is kinda outdated - but not THAT outdated.

And the story is set in the context of the Trojan war - but if you should consider the Iliad a "beware of Greeks" story is anyone's guess. While the original phrase (timeo danaos dona ferentes) is ascribed to a Trojan priest during that war, its author is Latin poet Virgil (Publius Vergilius Maro), who wrote this some 20 BC in the Aeneid - his own epic take on the Trojan war and the Roman origin myth. But he wrote that 1200 years (!) after the actual trojan war, and it quite likely transports more his contemporary Roman view on the Greeks than anything historical. While the Greeks cities had been major military powers in the Mediterranean sea for nearly a millennium, at Roman times they had no military power left and relied on soft powers like educatrion, diplomacy and trade. And that is what Romans saw, and why they "feared" Greeks bearing gifts.
 
Top Bottom