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old slave

FELIS RESPICIENS
:oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: Mea cupla. Mea maxima culpa!

Let me try another.
Not that much had changed by the 1950s, still plenty of cars like that, wooden road signs, big prams, ships with black smoke..............
Maybe more TV aerials on chimneys of thatched cottages, not quite as much evidence of horse-drawn trade
 

phlebas

PRIMUS POENUS
Staff member
:oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: Mea cupla. Mea maxima culpa!

Let me try another.
A lost world, remarkable. I wonder if the tourists stopped in at local farms along the way to buy cucumber sandwiches and ginger beer, as Enid Blyton's characters were always doing.

Not quite sure what's going on here.
View attachment 901860
Is that okra in your pocket or are you just pleased to see me? It's also known as lady's' fingers, you know.

There's more than one version of this pic out there

okra-smugglers-henryk-fantazos-1-03e14385.jpg
 

old slave

FELIS RESPICIENS
I wonder if the tourists stopped in at local farms along the way to buy cucumber sandwiches
From my memory of farmers' wives and farmhouse kitchens in the '50s, a cucumber would be on the table only when they were doing a posh tea.

As for a cucumber sandwich, that was reserved for them in the 'big house'.
 

Heineudo

Executioner
From my memory of farmers' wives and farmhouse kitchens in the '50s, a cucumber would be on the table only when they were doing a posh tea.

As for a cucumber sandwich, that was reserved for them in the 'big house'.
We often had cucumbers at home, but when my grandfather bought tomatoes for the first time in Jena, his words were: Oh, they don't taste sweet, I don't eat that and he didn't touch any tomatoes until he died. It must have been like that between the first and second world wars.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
From my memory of farmers' wives and farmhouse kitchens in the '50s, a cucumber would be on the table only when they were doing a posh tea.

As for a cucumber sandwich, that was reserved for them in the 'big house'.
I think until it had been bred out of them, cucumbers were notorious for causing wind - 'burpless' cucumbers were a high-class novelty.

I wonder if the tourists stopped in at local farms along the way to buy cucumber sandwiches and ginger beer, as Enid Blyton's characters were always doing.
There were no tourists during the war. And the farmers were busily hiding pigs etc. when the Men from the Ministry were coming to requisition them.

Not wanting to make a political point, certainly not a partisan one, but those are very romanticised versions of an imaginary England that seems to be being recycled today - and I don't deny we have our Scottish equivalent - but clinging to, or trying to go back to, an idyllic golden age is no way to deal with present-day problems.
 

Loxuru

Graf von Kreuzigung
linging to, or trying to go back to, an idyllic golden age is no way to deal with present-day problems.
The problem with idyllic golden ages is, that they actually never were. The 'Belle Epoque', the Beautiful Epoch, as the era from 1889 to 1914 is called in France and Belgium, is a hindsight after the attrocities of the First World War. But there were lots of problems too. The same for e.g. 'The Golden Sixties'. Reading contemporaneous reports and witnesses from now elderly people, indicate that the 1960 had their economic problems as well, and that some had difficulty to find jobs as well. The streets were not paved with gold, then.
 

phlebas

PRIMUS POENUS
Staff member
From my memory of farmers' wives and farmhouse kitchens in the '50s, a cucumber would be on the table only when they were doing a posh tea.

As for a cucumber sandwich, that was reserved for them in the 'big house'.
Well the Famous Five were of the boarding school section of society, true.

I think until it had been bred out of them, cucumbers were notorious for causing wind - 'burpless' cucumbers were a high-class novelty.


There were no tourists during the war. And the farmers were busily hiding pigs etc. when the Men from the Ministry were coming to requisition them.

Not wanting to make a political point, certainly not a partisan one, but those are very romanticised versions of an imaginary England that seems to be being recycled today - and I don't deny we have our Scottish equivalent - but clinging to, or trying to go back to, an idyllic golden age is no way to deal with present-day problems.
The original clip was of a pre war road trip, that's what I'm referring to when I say tourists, people actuially touring :)

I don't have the Famous Five stories in front of me but I'm sure the children would just take of across the countryside on their bikes, camping out, buying meals from farmer's wives etc, hard to imagine something like that now and I wonder how common it was then?

There is an attraction, as this website indicates
hbg-title-9780340681206-28.jpgputting-theff.jpgvisit-dorset-blog-famous-five-corfe-castle.jpg_tmp.jpg

Then their are the modern spoof titles, such as
3995070400000578-3858784-image-a-50_1477065446625.jpg3A06D4CB00000578-3903464-image-a-2_1478215923984.jpg

And a book inspired by their lavish picnics
71A0XGPecuL.jpg

The film does present what strikes us as a romanticised vision of a long gone England. Of course as Lox says it always looks better in hindsight, living as an ordinary labourer or farm worker in the 1930s was likely not a bundle of laughs, and their lives would look horribly limited to us, yet there is an attraction too. We live complicated lives, and these past times look romantic and simple and almost restful to modern eyes.
 

Eulalia

Poet Laureate
Staff member
I don't have the Famous Five stories in front of me but I'm sure the children would just take of across the countryside on their bikes, camping out, buying meals from farmer's wives etc, hard to imagine something like that now and I wonder how common it was then?
I think part of the attraction was probably of a fantasy world, but one close enough to home for kids to imagine themselves into it - not unlike some of our fantasies here, I suppose :D
 
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